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Ubuntu Linux Is an Ideal Windows Replacement

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Ubuntu

Can you use a reliable, free operating system that can run on new or older computers? How about an operating system that comes packed with hundreds of software programs? Do you want to try out a fully functional OS that runs in a live CD session and can coexist with Windows or Mac operating systems on a dual-boot hard drive installation?

The Linux operating system exists in dozens of individually tailored versions known as "distributions." Each one is based on open source standards and is the product of a sponsoring community of developers who target a specific type of user -- enterprise, educational or commercial.

Platform of Choice
The stable and easy to install Ubuntu distribution is fast becoming the Linux platform of choice. You can run Linux on any computer using Ubuntu's Live CD feature, and save your files and settings to a USB flash drive for instant access -- giving a new meaning to "portable computing."

Full Story @ LinuxInsider.

I recently installed Ubuntu

I recently installed Ubuntu 6.06.1 for the first time and would almost agree it is the ideal Windows replacement. Almost.

I consider myself pretty competent with computers and working with OS's, but I'm about to give up once again on Linux. Well, not really give up, but I won't be able to make it my primary OS. I have recently come back to using Linux after trying Mandrake about five years ago.

I am someone who really really wants to use Linux as much as possible and use Windows as little as possible. The problem is, until the day comes when you don't have to resolve a million dependencies just to install a program, home users aren't going to like Linux. I tried to install one program last night (Audacity) and never could do it. First its dependencies weren't present and then the dependencies wouldn't install due to problems with other dependencies. Meanwhile, the same program installs under Windows quickly and easily.

Also, until people can install a hardware device, such as a wireless network card, and have it work without jumping through many hoops, Linux just won't be viable for the average every day home user. I have a wireless card that, despite being listed on several hardware compatability lists I looked at, simply refuses to connect to the AP. I tried setting it up with ndiswrapper and then later MadWiFi, both of which "should" have worked, but so far no dice.

Don't get me wrong. There is much to like about Linux and I would love to ditch M$ once and for all for Linux. Unfortunately, it's just not going to be the true alternative for every day users until seemingly simple things can be done without hassle. I strongly disagree with the way M$ conducts itself, which is probably the main reason I want to get away from Windows, not to mention the endless security problems in M$ software. But when it comes right down to it, for all its many faults, Windows does work. Linux is great and I really want it to be my main OS, but I have to wonder if that can ever happen.
KP

Ubuntu as a Windows Replacement

I have installed Ubuntu's sister KDE based distro, Kubuntu on a variety of equipment. It it more difficult to install, configure, and tweak than other Distros. I have found that PCLinuxOS is by far and away the easiest distro to install, configure, and set like you want it.

I see all these Ubuntu/Kubuntu articles with command line directions (sudo apt-get install this, sudo apt-get install that . . .).

One rarely has to go to the command line with PCLinuxOS. The PCLinuxOS repository has over 5000 packages in it. Even with that many packages in the repositories, I've rarely encountered package dependency issues (unlike Mandriva). The GUI package manager (Synaptic) works great.

I believe that PCLinuxOS is the best Linux desktop (not server) distro for the average person switching from MS-Win to Linux. Great hardware support, outstanding breadth of packages, good docs and very friendly forum help at www.pclinuxos.com. Plus, IT JUST WORKS.

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