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NanoPi Neo4 SBC breaks RK3399 records for size and price

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Android
Linux
Ubuntu

FriendlyElec has launched a $45, Rockchip RK3399 based “NanoPi Neo4” SBC with a 60 x 45mm footprint, WiFi/BT, GbE, USB 3.0, HDMI 2.0, MIPI-CSI, a 40-pin header, and -20 to 70℃ support — but only 1GB of RAM.

In August, FriendlyElec introduced the NanoPi M4, which was then the smallest, most affordable Rockchip RK3399 based SBC yet. The company has now eclipsed the Raspberry Pi style, 85 x 56mm NanoPi M4 on both counts, with a 60 x 45mm size and $45 promotional price ($50 standard). The similarly open-spec, Linux and Android-ready NanoPi Neo4, however, is not likely to beat the M4 on performance, as it ships with only 1GB of DDR3-1866 instead of 2GB or 4GB of LPDDR3.

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