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4 Must-Have Tools for Monitoring Linux

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Linux

Linux. It’s powerful, flexible, stable, secure, user-friendly… the list goes on and on. There are so many reasons why people have adopted the open source operating system. One of those reasons which particularly stands out is its flexibility. Linux can be and do almost anything. In fact, it will (in most cases) go well above what most platforms can. Just ask any enterprise business why they use Linux and open source.

But once you’ve deployed those servers and desktops, you need to be able to keep track of them. What’s going on? How are they performing? Is something afoot? In other words, you need to be able to monitor your Linux machines. “How?” you ask. That’s a great question, and one with many answers. I want to introduce you to a few such tools—from command line, to GUI, to full-blown web interfaces (with plenty of bells and whistles). From this collection of tools, you can gather just about any kind of information you need. I will stick only with tools that are open source, which will exempt some high-quality, proprietary solutions. But it’s always best to start with open source, and, chances are, you’ll find everything you need to monitor your desktops and servers. So, let’s take a look at four such tools.

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