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Games Leftovers

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Gaming
  • Mounting And Optimizing A Linux Gamer Computer

    We have had a lot of news about games in the Linux world coming out in recent weeks. We already have an interesting performance for games like Grand Theft Auto V, and the trend is for the compatibility level to improve every day, with Valve's recent announcement of Proton as announced here! This even was the head behind the development of DXVK which brought a new step in the compatibility of Windows games on Linux.

  • Stranded Deep adds a new experimental couch co-op mode to survive together

    To go along with this new feature, they also added a Player Ragdoll for when you're knocked out or dead. You partner can help you up with bandages before you bleed out and bodies can be dragged as well for maximum fun. It's good to see them add more from their roadmap, with plenty more still to come before it leaves Early Access.

    They also added a Raft Passenger Seat, fixed a bunch of bugs and updated Unity to "2017.4.13f1". Also the shark music won't play until you're actually attacked so no more early warnings for you.

  • .Age (dot Age) is a turn-based village builder showing off the harsh reality of the Dark Ages

    .Age (dot Age) seems like it could be a very interesting game. A harsh turn-based village builder that will throw events at you like candy, don't be fooled by the cute and colourful style as this is a menacing game.

    Developed by CKC Games, it's due out sometime next year. When spotted on Twitter, we spoke to the developer who confirmed "I've had a linux build for years" so it's coming to Linux at release.

  • inXile confirm the Linux version of The Bard's Tale IV is being worked on

    For those waiting on the native Linux version of The Bard's Tale IV, fear not, as inXile Entertainment have confirmed they're working on it.

  • AI combat arena 'Gladiabots' has enabled Linux support on Steam

    No longer hidden behind a beta of Steam, AI combat arena Gladiabots from GFX47 is now officially supported on Steam for Linux. Do note, the game is still in Early Access.

    If you love strategy games and feel like you want a little more control over unit AI, this might be the game for you. In Gladiabots you assemble a team of robots, design their AI with a handy drag and drop interface and attempt to beat another AI in battle. There's decent tutorials, a campaign, cross-platform online play that doesn't require you to be online at the same time and it's really quite clever.

  • Dungeon crawler 'The 7th Circle' adds Linux support, looks pretty good

    For those who love their first-person dungeon crawlers, The 7th Circle actually looks pretty good and they recently added Linux support.

    It's not going to win any awards for originality here, but 68k Studios seem to have created a reasonably good retro-inspired dungeon crawler. With traditional turn-based combat, more than 60 spells to wield, a crafting and upgrades system and so on it's pretty full on features.

  • Action-RPG 'Moonlighter' has a juicy free Adventure Update, now live on Linux

    It's time to close up shop and go on another run through the dungeons as Moonlighter has a free update now out. This update originally released last week, with the Linux version only seeing the update today.

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

10+ Open Source Software Writing Tools That Every Writer Should Know

Being a professional writer requires two key things to help ensure success: commitment and support. The former comes from the writer, and the latter comes from the tools he (or she) uses to get the job done. Below is a list of 11 great and lesser-known writing tools or apps, many of which are free and open-source, that can help improve the quality of your writing and make you a more productive and successful writer. Read more