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Linus Torvalds is Back

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Linux
  • ​Linus Torvalds is back in charge of Linux

    At Open Source Summit Europe in Scotland, Linus Torvalds is meeting with Linux's top 40 or so developers at the Maintainers' Summit. This is his first step back in taking over Linux's reins.

    A little over a month ago, Torvalds stepped back from running the Linux development community. In a note to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), Torvalds said, "I need to change some of my behavior, and I want to apologize to the people that my personal behavior hurt and possibly drove away from kernel development entirely. I am going to take time off and get some assistance on how to understand people's emotions and respond appropriately."

  • Linus Torvalds is back in charge as Linux kernel 4.19 is released

    After taking some time out from the Linux community to "change some of [his] behavior", Linux Torvalds is back. In a post to the Linux Kernel Mailing List announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.19, Greg Kroah-Hartman -- his temporary replacement -- handed back the reins.

    After writing about the changes to be found in the latest release, Kroah-Hartman signed off by saying: "Linus, I'm handing the kernel tree back to you. You can have the joy of dealing with the merge window :)".

  • Linux Kernel 4.19 “People’s Front” Released; Linus Torvalds Back For 4.20 Development

    The incidents that preceded (and accompanied) the Linux kernel 4.19 development cycle have has been one of the most critical ones faced by the Linux community. In order to bring some major changes to the community, Linus Torvalds took a break from kernel development and passed the baton to Greg Kroah-Hartman. A new Code of Conduct was also adopted.

    Now, after eight release candidates, Greg has released the Linux kernel 4.19. Underlining the ongoing challenges, he wrote in the release post: “It’s been a long strange journey for this kernel release…”

  • [Old] With Linux’s founder stepping back, will the community change its culture? [Ed: Bill Gates-connected site really sticking it in to Torvalds. Just watch carefully who wants him out and why. LF kicked community members out of the Board, gave seats there to Microsoft. So Microsoft now has more influence over the future/direction of Linux than community members (i.e. not large corporations).]
  • Intel's IWD Linux Wireless Daemon Out With Version 0.10

    IWD continues maintaining a very small footprint in order to be suitable for embedded/IoT use-cases with having minimal dependencies though supporting networkd/NetworkManager/ConnMan if present on the system. With the new IWD 0.10 release is support for using an external Embedded Linux Library (ELL). The ELL library is another open-source Intel project providing low-level functionality for Linux system daemons and having no dependencies in turn other than the Linux kernel and C standard library. ELL can scale up from embedded to desktop systems and more while providing a lot of features around D-Bus, signal handling, crypto, and other tasks.

SJVN Brings up the CoC Again

  • ​Revised Linux Code of Conduct is now officially part of Linux

    Some organizations might not include their Code of Conduct in the software source code tree, but the Linux developers aren't your ordinary group. In the Linux 4.19 announcement, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux's leader for this release and maintainer of the stable branch, added in the Code of Conduct and some minor changes.

Linus Torvalds is back at the helm of Linux

  • Linus Torvalds is back at the helm of Linux

    Linus Torvalds is back in charge of Linux, following a self-imposed break from his duties pertaining to the open source operating system.

    His temporary replacement, Greg Kroah-Hartman, announced the return of Torvalds in a post which detailed the release of Linux kernel 4.19, and the various tweaks and adjustments therein.

    As Betanews spotted, Kroah-Hartman wrote: “Linus, I'm handing the kernel tree back to you. You can have the joy of dealing with the merge window.”

    The release notes clarify that this wasn’t the largest kernel release going by the number of commits, but that it was larger than the past three releases, and a trickle of ‘good bug fixes’ came in during the past week, which showed that waiting an extra week was a sensible choice.

Great News! Linus Torvalds is Back in Charge of Linux

  • Great News! Linus Torvalds is Back in Charge of Linux

    Good news Linux folks. Linus Torvalds is back in charge of Linux.

    To refresh your memory a bit, a few weeks back Linus Torvalds announced that he is taking some time off from Linux Kernel development to improve his behavior.

    This announcement came right after he signed off the controversial Linux code of conduct.

    He was scheduled to speak at the Open Source Summit in Edinburgh but his talk was removed after he took the sudden temporary break.

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