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Richard Stallman in Guayaquil

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OSS

Yesterday at 18:30, I had a first-hand opportunity to see Richard Stallman live.

He came to Guayaquil, Ecuador for the first time ever to give a series of talks on Free Software. The first talk was on Free Software and the ethics and values of the movement. The second talk, due today in the morning, was about the dangers of patents in the field of software.

Laughs and smiles

I did not hear a single thing that I didn’t know already. So, what was so special about the talk? In two words: the speaker.

Richard is a candid speaker. He talks very well in Spanish, may I say, albeit with a bit of an accent. He jokes — and the audience feels the pun and laughs. He speaks to the point, not fast but rather slow and with judicious pauses, so everyone can follow him.

Listening to Richard giving a speech is something everyone intending to give speeches should do — the down-to-earth quality of his interaction with the audience is definitely to be copied by any serious public speaker.

The obvious, spoken out loud

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