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Lightweight and Customizable Windows Manager, Introducing Fluxbox

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Fluxbox

Okay, when I first install fluxbox, I feel so lost, there have nothing at all, donno how to access my programs, donno what to do, it is clean and clear. With the ease of geek00L’s hints, and fluxbox wiki, I have learn the way to cope with it. I have customized my fluxbox, I have my own set of key binding to execute programs I usually runs. I have my root menu, where I can access some programs which I do not bind on any specific key. I have my startup script which automatically load all the programs when I login. I compile my own fluxbox, and now I can’t feel comfortable without fluxbox.

I am a windows user, and become gnome user, and I install fluxbox on top of ubuntu. Therefore my customization is some how have connections to these tools. Okay, let me start with installation. Fluxbox should be in your repository, if not, download it from fluxbox official site.

To download at debian based distro, use apt-get

apt-get install fluxbox

To download at red hat, fedora based, use yum

yum install fluxbox

You are done installing, to login to fluxbox, easy, logout KDE or Gnome (most distro have either one installed by default, just my assumption) and choose other session, you should be able to find “fluxbox”, pick that, and login.

Its emptiness!

Full Story.

(Also: I have an old article that may have some helpful tips for customizing HERE.)

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