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Microsoft 'Encryption' and Intel 'Security'

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Microsoft
Security
  • You Can’t Trust BitLocker to Encrypt Your SSD on Windows 10 [Ed: Actually, it has long been known that Microsoft's BitLocker has NSA back doors. Even Microsoft staff spoke about it. It's for fools.]

    Some SSDs advertise support for “hardware encryption.” If you enable BitLocker on Windows, Microsoft trusts your SSD and doesn’t do anything. But researchers have found that many SSDs are doing a terrible job, which means BitLocker isn’t providing secure encryption.

  • Flaws in self-encrypting SSDs let attackers bypass disk encryption

    Researchers at Radboud University in the Netherlands have revealed today vulnerabilities in some solid-state drives (SSDs) that allow an attacker to bypass the disk encryption feature and access the local data without knowing the user-chosen disk encryption password.

    The vulnerabilities only affect SSD models that support hardware-based encryption, where the disk encryption operations are carried out via a local built-in chip, separate from the main CPU.

    Such devices are also known as self-encrypting drives (SEDs) and have become popular in recent years after software-level full disk encryption was proven vulnerable to attacks where intruders would steal the encryption password from the computer's RAM.

  • New Intel CPU Flaw Exploits Hyper-Threading to Steal Encrypted Data

    A team of security researchers has discovered another serious side-channel vulnerability in Intel CPUs that could allow an attacker to sniff out sensitive protected data, like passwords and cryptographic keys, from other processes running in the same CPU core with simultaneous multi-threading feature enabled.

    The vulnerability, codenamed PortSmash (CVE-2018-5407), has joined the list of other dangerous side-channel vulnerabilities discovered in the past year, including Meltdown and Spectre, TLBleed, and Foreshadow.

Windows BitLocker back doors (several of them) exacerbated

  • Flaw In SSDs Allows Hackers To Access Encrypted Data Without Password

    However, the issue runs deeper. Windows users are more risk-prone as the Windows BitLocker, a software-level full disk encryption system of Windows OS does not encrypt the users’ data at the software level upon detecting a device capable of hardware-based encryption.

    The researchers have recommended the SED users to use software-level full disk encryption systems such as VeraCrypt to protect their data.

"Microsoft for defaulting to using these broken encryption"

  • Researchers expose 'critical vulnerabilities' in SSD encryption

    After considering a handful of possible flaws in hardware-based full-disk encryption, or self-encrypting drives (SEDs), the pair reverse-engineered the firmware of a sample of SSDs and tried to expose these vulnerabilities.

    They learned that hackers can launch a range of attacks, from seizing full control of the CPU to corrupting memory - outlining their findings in a paper titled 'self-encrypting deception: weakness in the encryption of solid state drives (SSDs)'.

    There are a host of exploits that can be used, such as cracking master passwords, set by the manufacturer as a factory default. These are routinely found in many SSDs, and if obtained by an attacker could allow them to bypass any custom password set by a user.

  • Crucial and Samsung SSDs' Encryption Is Easily Bypassed

    Researchers from Radboud University in The Netherlands reported today their discovery that hackers could easily bypass the encryption on Crucial and Samsung SSDs without the user’s passwords. The researchers also pointed at Microsoft for defaulting to using these broken encryption schemes on modern drives.

    The Dutch researchers reverse-engineered the firmware of multiple drives and found a “pattern of critical issues." In one case, the drive’s master password used to decrypt data was just an empty string, which means someone would have been able to decrypt it by just pressing the Enter key on their keyboard. In another case, the researchers said the drive could be unlocked with “any password” because the drive’s password validation checks didn’t work.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Sphinx, Ransomware, Webmin, YubiKey

  • Exposed Sphinx Servers Are No Challenge for Hackers [Ed: That’s the same agency and the same troll site that initially promoted the lies and the FUD about VLC]

    A popular open-source text search server, Sphinx offers impressive performance for indexing and searching data in databases or just in files. It is cross-platform, available for Linux, Windows, macOS, Solaris, FreeBSD, and a few other operating systems. [...] CERT-Bund posted the warning on Twitter today alerting network operators and providers about the risk of running Sphinx servers with a default configuration that are open on the web. The organization highlights that Sphinx lacks any authentication mechanisms. Exposing it on the web gives an attacker the possibility "to read, modify or delete any data stored in the Sphinx database."

  • Ransomware Hits Texas Local Governments [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The attack was observed on the morning of August 16 and appears to have been launched by a single threat actor, the DIR announcement reads.

    The State Operations Center (SOC) was activated soon after the attack reports started to come in, and DIR says that all of the entities that were actually or potentially affected appear to have been identified and notified.

    A total of twenty-three entities have been confirmed as impacted so far, and the responders are working on bringing the affected systems back online.

  • Webmin Backdoored for Over a Year

    The security hole impacts Webmin 1.882 through 1.921, but most versions are not vulnerable in their default configuration as the affected feature is not enabled by default. Version 1.890 is affected in the default configuration. The issue has been addressed with the release of Webmin 1.930 and Usermin version 1.780.

  • The YubiKey 5Ci is the 'first' iOS-compatible security key

    Like other YubiKey options in the 5 series, the YubiKey 5Ci supports multiple authentication protocols, including IDO2/WebAuthn, FIDO U2F, OTP (one-time-password), PIV (Smart Card), and OpenPGP.

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