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GNU: GCC Adding Hardware Support, libredwg 0.6.2 Released

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GNU
  • OpenRISC Port Revised For GCC, Still Trying To Be Mainlined Soon

    The GCC steering committee decided earlier this year they will accept the OpenRISC port for this processor ISA while the patches for it are still being prepped.

    This RISC-based open-source processor ISA has struggled to get the GCC compiler support in place after their original toolchain support was rejected: the original developers were not okay with assigning their code's copyright to the Free Software Foundation as is required for contributions to the GNU Compiler Collection. So an OpenRISC developer has been doing a clean-room rewrite of the OpenRISC GCC code since earlier this year in order to be able to mainline the code.

  • GCC Picks Up Support For Newer Loongson Processors

    Ahead of the GCC 9 feature freeze later this month, support for several newer Loongson processors have been picked up by this leading open-source compiler.

    As of today in GCC Git/SVN, the Loongson 2K1000, 3A1000, 3A2000, and 3A3000 processors are supported by the GCC compiler. In the process, the Loongson MMI, EXT, and EXT2 instructions are added as well. These processors were previously floating on the mailing list.

  • ARM Posts Compiler Patches For Their New "Ares" High Performance Core

    It's been a few years since "Ares" first appeared on the ARM road-map and it looks like this high performance core might be close to finally shipping.

    Ares first came up on the ARM road-map around 2015 when it was presented as a high-end core for servers/enterprise or even large tablets and would be manufactured on a 10nm process and have a power consumption of 1~1.2 Watts per core and based on ARM Cortex-A72. There has been some indications since that this Ares core might have shifted to a 7nm process but public information overall has been light.

  • libredwg-0.6.2 released

    Important bugfixes:
    * Fixed several out_dxf segfaults (#39)
    * Enhanced the section size limit from 2032 to 2040.
    There were several DWG files with a section size of 2035
    in the wild. (PR #41, Denis Pryt)
    * Fixed EED realloc on decoding when end - dat->byte == 1
    (PR #41, Denis Pryt)

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