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Rclone - An Rsync Alternative To Sync File With Online Cloud Storage

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Linux

Backup and Sync are have become essential today and this brings tools like rsync. Rsync is an amazing tool to sync files between 2 computers. But wouldn’t it be cooler if we could sync files from a computer to a cloud storage. This is where rclone - a mod of rsync comes in. Rclone can sync files from your computer to cloud-based storage services including google drive, one drive, drop-box, amazon drive and many more.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Shell Development Updates

  • GNOME Shell + Mutter Begin Landing Graphene Integration

    Graphene is a lightweight library that has been in development by GNOME's Emmanuele Bassi. Graphene -- not to be confused with several other software projects sharing similar names -- is intended as a very lightweight library providing graphics types and their relative API while avoiding any windowing system bits and other functionality with this layer just focused on providing speedy vector operations. Graphene has fast paths for SSE2, ARM NEON, GCC Vector extensions, and other optimizations for optimally dealing with graphic data types like matrices, vectors and points. [...] With part 1, various geometry/point/rectangle/vector Clutter objects are replaced with Graphene code. Ultimately this should provide for better performance around various graphic data type operations while also cleaning up some of GNOME's low-level code in the process. This initial integration is now in place for the initial GNOME 3.35/3.36 series though expect more Graphene improvements to come now that the initial support and dependency are in place.

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 2

    Well, we are starting the 3rd and last day of this hackfest… I’ll write about yesterday, which probably means tomorrow I’ll blog about today :).

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 3

    As promised, some late notes on the 3rd and last day of the gnome-shell hackfest, so yesterday!

Graphics: Libdrm, AMDGPU, AR/VR and Gallium3D

  • Libdrm 2.4.100 Released With Bits For Intel Elkhart Lake, Tiger Lake Graphics

    AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák on Wednesday released libdrm 2.4.100 as the newest feature update to this Mesa DRM library. On the AMD front there are a number of RAS tests added, a new amdgpu_cs_query_reset_state2 interface, and other expanded AMDGPU test coverage.

  • AMDGPU GFX9+ Format Modifiers Being Worked On For Better DCC Handling

    RADV Vulkan driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen of Google has ventured into kernel space in working on format modifiers support for Vega/GFX9 and newer. This DRM format modifiers support for GFX9+ is being worked on for helping to evaluate when delta color compression (DCC) can be used and any other requirements around that DCC handling. Bas explained, "This is particularly useful to determine if we can use DCC, and whether we need an extra display compatible DCC metadata plane."

  • Free software support for virtual and augmented reality

    A talk at the recent X.Org Developers Conference in Montréal, Canada looked at support for "XR" in free software. XR is an umbrella term that includes both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). In the talk, Joey Ferwerda and Christoph Haag from Collabora gave an overview of XR and the Monado project that provides support for those types of applications. Ferwerda started by defining the term "HMD", which predates VR and AR. It is a head-mounted display, which basically means "taking a screen and some sensors and duct-taping it to your face". All of the devices that are being used for XR are HMDs. They typically include some kind of tracking system to determine the position and orientation of the HMD itself. Multiple different technologies, including inertial measurement units (IMUs), photodiodes, lasers, and cameras, are used to do the tracking depending on the device and its use case. AR is intended to augment the real world with extra information; the user sees the real world around them, but various kinds of status and additional data is tagged to objects or locations in their view of the world. AR is a rather over-hyped technology these days, he said. The general idea is that users would wear glasses that would augment their view in some fashion, but, unfortunately, what most people think of as AR is Pokémon Go. VR uses two screens, one for each eye, to create a 3D world that the user inhabits and can interact with in some fashion. Instead of seeing the real world, the user sees a completely separate world. There are two words that are often used to describe the feel of VR, he said: "presence" and "immersion". That means users are aware of themselves as being part of the VR environment. XR encompasses both. Ferwerda said that he is not really sure what the "X" stands for; he has heard "cross reality" and "mixed reality" for XR. Haag said that "extended reality" was another definition that he had heard.

  • Intel Now Aiming For Gallium3D OpenGL Default For Mesa 20.0

    For the better part of two years now Intel has been working on this new "Iris" Gallium3D driver for supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer as the eventual replacement to their long-standing i965 classic driver. With Tiger Lake "Gen12" Xe graphics, it's in fact Iris Gallium3D only. In our testing of Broadwell through the *lakes, this Gallium3D driver has been working out terrific on Mesa 19.2 stable and Mesa 19.3 development. But it looks like Intel is going to play it safe and punt the default change-over to next quarter's Mesa 20.0 cycle.

Embedded system cross-development with Ubuntu Core

There are fundamental differences between developing general-purpose software applications and making software for embedded systems. Embedded systems software runs on resource-constrained hardware, in contrast to general-purpose server or client applications that run on more capable hardware. For this reason, embedded system software is not directly developed on the electronic board it will run on – referred to as the target. It is rather developed on a computer – the host – that has a higher computational capacity than the target board. Read more

LibreOffice: LibreOffice 6.2.8, FOSDEM 2020 and LibreOffice Conference 2019

  • LibreOffice 6.2.8 is available, the last release of the 6.2 family

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.8, the last minor release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family. All users of LibreOffice 6.2.x versions should update immediately for enhanced security, and be prepared to upgrade to LibreOffice 6.3.4 as soon as it becomes available in December. For enterprise class deployments, TDF strongly recommends sourcing LibreOffice from one of the ecosystem partners to get long-term supported releases, dedicated assistance, custom new features and bug fixes, and other benefits. Also, the work done by ecosystem partners flows back into the LibreOffice project, benefiting everyone. LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available. LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://ask.libreoffice.org, where they can get and provide user-to-user support. While TDF can not provide commercial level support, there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos on the website and the wiki. Your donations help us make these available.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.8 Arrives as the Last in the Series, Prepare for LibreOffice 6.3

    The Document Foundation released today the eight and final maintenance update for the LibreOffice 6.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite series. LibreOffice 6.2.8 is here one and a half months after the release of LibreOffice 6.2.7, which was announced in early September alongside the first point release of the latest LibreOffice 6.3 series. This maintenance release brings a total of 26 bug fixes and improvements across various components, as detailed here and here. While the LibreOffice 6.2 office suite series is still recommended for enterprise deployments, unfortunately it will reach end of life next month on November 30th. As such, the Document Foundation recommends all enterprise users to update to LibreOffice 6.2.8 immediately for enhanced security, and start preparing to upgrade to LibreOffice 6.3.

  • FOSDEM 2020: Open Document Editors DevRoom Call for Papers

    FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each year in Brussels (Belgium) at the ULB Campus Solbosch. In 2020, it will be held on Saturday, February 1, and Sunday, February 2. The Open Document Editors (OFE) DevRoom is scheduled for Saturday, February 1, from 10:30AM to 7PM. Physical room has not yet been assigned by FOSDEM. The shared devroom gives all project in this area a chance to present ODF related developments and innovations. We are now inviting proposals for talks about Open Document Editors or the ODF document format, on topics such as code, extensions, localization, QA, UX, tools and adoption related cases. This is a unique opportunity to show new ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

  • Eight videos from the auditorium at LibreOffice Conference 2019

    In September we had the LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. We’re uploading videos from the presentations that took place, so here’s a new batch! First up is “Janitor of Sanity” with Stephan Bergmann...