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Chromebooks With GNU/Linux Software and Windows Breaking Itself (Again)

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  • Linux Apps For MediaTek Chromebooks A Little Closer

    If you are the proud owner of a MediaTek-powered Chromebook such as the Acer Chromebook R13 or Lenovo Flex 11, some new features are headed your way.

    Spotted in the Canary channel in mid-October, the Crostini Project is now live in the Developer channel for Chromebooks with the ARM-based MediaTek processor. This brings native Linux app functionality to the Chromebooks with the MT8173C chipset and although the number of devices is few, MediaTek Chromebooks are relatively inexpensive and versatile machines.

  • Some Chromebooks Won’t Get Linux Apps. Here’s What You Can Do Instead

    When Chromebooks first began getting support for Android apps, there was some confusion as to just which Chromebooks would be supported. The same thing is starting to play out—though to a lesser degree—with support for Linux apps.

    You’ve always been able to install Linux applications (or other Linux-based operating systems) on Chromebooks through a workaround called Crouton because Chrome OS is based on the Linux kernel. The new method for installing Linux apps is much easier than before since it’s a baked-in part of the operating system.

    But not all Chromebooks will get official support for Linux apps. Here’s the deal.

  • The Chromium OS rootfs is mounted read-only. In developer mode you can disable the rootfs verification, enabling it to be modified.
  • Microsoft Acknowledges Issues with Edge Developer Tools and SQL Connection in cumulative update KB4462933

    In October 2018, Microsoft had release a cumulative update KB4462933 for Windows 10 V1803 users who had installed Windows 10 April 2018 update. This cumulative update released on 24th October lifted Windows 10 V1803 to build 17134376. It was a massive update with several important improvements and fixes. However, there were two main issues with this update that no one had noticed before, BornCity reports. One of the issues is the dysfunctional behavior of Edge Developer Tools and another is problems with SQL connections. These issues were also acknowledged by Microsoft on its support page for this update.

    According to WindowsLatest, Microsoft had not originally acknowledged the presence of these issues but later quietly updated the document to confirm these two issues being faced with the latest update.

Chrome OS Linux app support may be coming to the 2015 Chromebook

  • Chrome OS Linux app support may be coming to the 2015 Chromebook Pixel

    Linux app support has slowly been bringing new levels of desktop productivity to Chromebooks both new and old. Earlier this month, we reported that a vast swath of Chromebooks would sadly never receive this feature. One we weren’t sure of, Google’s 2015 Chromebook Pixel, may be getting this breath of new life judging from new code changes.

    Google has kindly documented three primary reasons why a Chrome OS device would not be able to support Linux apps via the Crostini project. The first is that some Intel Atom processors do not have the necessary virtualization support. The second being that virtualization is a non-standard operation for 32-bit ARM processors. The final issue is that Linux apps support requires a newer version of the Linux kernel’s KVM, found in Linux versions above 3.14.

A Bug In Windows 10 Pro Is Forcing Users Downgrade

Microsoft Warns Windows 10 Has An Expensive Problem

  • Microsoft Warns Windows 10 Has An Expensive Problem

    Microsoft’s activation servers have started accidentally downgrading expensive Windows 10 Pro systems into cheaper Windows 10 Home PCs, then invalidating their licences. Needless to say, that’s a nasty financial hit (Home is $119, Pro is $199) and affected users are furious.

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