SELinux: Comprehensive security at the price of usability

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Linux

Operating system security revolves around controlling access. Linux distributions subscribe to the Discretionary Access Control (DAC) mechanism that lets resource owners decide who gets to access the resource and how. People soon realized that DAC is not an ideal solution, as it gives applications the same privileges of the user running them. One compromised application running as root effectively compromises the full system. This led security experts to develop Mandatory Access Control (MAC), which grants access to resources as defined by a security policy, regardless of the user running the application. The Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) project is the first mainstream implementation of MAC.

The benefit of SELinux is twofold. First, it replaces the user-based model with a policy-centric model. Every action, like running an application or reading and modifying data, is controlled by a security policy. Actions that violate the policy are denied. Additionally, SELinux compartmentalizes the various applications and processes running on the system. This not only helps in isolating a break-in, but also confines the damage caused by one compromised service.

SELinux plugs into the Linux distribution through the Linux Security Module (LSM) hooks, which are available in the 2.6.x kernel series. LSM was designed to integrate security models to work with the kernel, instead of applying them as a patch.

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