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SUSE 10.2 Review

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SUSE

The biggest Linux event this December is without a doubt the new release of SUSE. It was announced early, the scheduled date was met and on the 7th of December the much awaited SUSE 10.2 was out and available for download. This time SUSE was in a very good position. Ubuntu 6.10, Fedora Core 6 and Mandriva 2007 were released in October, and this gave SUSE nearly two months to inspect them, learn from their respective innovations and make SUSE 10.2 the best desktop Linux distribution available on the market. Had they done so? I couldn't wait to find out!

SUSE 10.2 can be downloaded as a DVD or as a set of 5 CDs for x86, x86-64 and PPC architectures. There are also two additional CDs that you can download, one that contains language packs and the other one for non-open-source software. Of course everything is also available from the repositories, so if you're only interested in a default English Gnome or KDE desktop installation, all you need is to download the first three CDs.

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