Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

On the Bench: OpenSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

Suse 7.2 was my first Linux distribution ever, around five years ago. I was impressed but also had to struggle with all kinds of issues. That was part of the fun. I remember the sales pitch that working with Linux is like working on the engine of a car while it is running. You were supposed to fix things as you went along. Ever since, the distributions became more and more userfriendly. Suse was bought by Novell, Yast was open sourced and recently Novell made a pact with Microsoft. Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 is considered by many as a solid enterprise ready desktop and community development is taking place in the OpenSUSE project. Over the years I have been impressed and disappointed with the Suse releases. I had serious issues with either 9.1 or 9.2 that would destroy the ability to multiboot to XP. There was a simple patch, but in the Novell Linux package six months later that patch was still not integrated. Then there were the issues with the software update module in 10.x. On the other side there were the spit and polish and the ease of use of Yast, so SUSE and OpenSUSE are distribution I like to keep my eye on as serious contenders to convince Windows to Linux migrators.

OpenSUSE 10.2 is available in either 5 CD’s (plus 1 Add-on packages disk), 1 DVD (http://en.opensuse.org/Download) or a retail double-layer DVD. For this testrun I downloaded the DVD through bittorrent.

Installation

Yast is still taking care of the installation routine and that remains a solid and powerfull tool. You can select either KDE or Gnome as your favorite desktop. The option “other” only provides two new options, minimal or no graphical interface. I decided to stick with Gnome for now and accept the default packageselection, which left me with a 2,33 Gb install. This is somewhat bigger than a default Ubuntu install. One thing I really like about Yast is the overview screen where you can tweak all installation settings. This would certainly appeal to the Windows powerusers, but could overwhelm the more average users.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Thunderbird 45.0 to Finally Bring GTK3 Integration for Linux, Sort Of

Earlier today, Mozilla has come out with the sixth point release of the stable 38.0 branch of its Thunderbird e-mail, news, and chat client, fixing a few minor issues reported by users since the 38.5.x series. Read more

OpenPHT 1.5.1 for Debian/sid

I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.1 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details. Read more

A man with his Fingers in many millions of pies

At the time of writing, over five million Raspberry Pis have been sold. That’s the same as the number of ZX Spectrums sold in the 80s. And like the Spectrum, the Pi is likely to have a far-reaching legacy, helping the next generation of games designers and computer scientists find their feet. Countless numbers of people have helped make this happen, but Eben Upton has been there from the beginning. He’s the founder and the CEO of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, and he’s still shaping every aspect of the Raspberry Pi, from its hardware to the software. We met Eben shortly before the launch of the model 2. He told us about the effort they’ve put into making the Pi better and how a chance conversation with the boss of Google shaped the Pi’s future. Read more

Linux for your Loved Ones

Few things in this life are more frustrating than trying to provide tech support to loved ones. If you’re reading this, odds are you’ve run into this experience yourself at some point in your life. Now, I should point out that no operating system is completely free from bugs. Even the most locked down devices, such as tablets or Chromebooks can still experience challenges due to connectivity. I believe today’s popular Linux distributions are a far better option in the long run. Using a Linux distro often means you can work with existing PC hardware instead of buying new stuff. And unlike Google’s Chromebook, you’re not providing remote access help over wifi – the older PC running Linux happens to have a wired connection. This alone is enough to save one’s sanity. (Read the rest)