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Tip of the Trade: Recovery Is Possible

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Linux

Recovery is Possible (RIP) sounds like a 12-step program, or some kind of self-help regime. RIP is (yet another) specialized Linux rescue distribution. RIP comes in a number of bootable images: CD/DVD, USB key, Compact Flash, PXE netboot, and even a tiny FreeBSD-based image. You can get a version with X windows, or one without.

RIP is for experienced admins who do not need a lot of handholding, or all the bells and whistles of a Jabba-sized live CD Linux, like Knoppix. For its compact size, it comes with an extremely useful assortment of rescue tools for Linux, Unix and Windows.

RIP supports IDE, SATA and SCSI drives, as well as LVM1/2 and RAID. It contains all the userland utilities for both Linux and Windows filesystems: ext2/3, JFS, XFS, ReiserFS, FAT 16/32, and NTFS.

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