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Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Posts Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Feature Changes Ahead Of Linux 4.21

    With the time for new Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver feature material to enter DRM-Next for the Linux 4.21 kernel cycle quickly coming to a close, the Intel Open-Source Technology Center crew has sent in a final feature pull of material for this next kernel development cycle.

    As the DRM-Next feature cutoff happens a few weeks prior to the end of the current kernel cycle, in the days ahead will mark that point for Linux 4.21 with 4.20 marching along for debut around Christmas. The open-source Intel developers have already sent in a few feature updates in the past few weeks to DRM-Next while today was their final expected batch for 4.21.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0 Bringing Big Improvements For Turing GPUs

    NVIDIA has quietly outed the key features they will be introducing with their upcoming Video Codec SDK 9.0 release.

    The NVIDIA Video Codec SDK for Linux users is the company's successor to VDPAU and offers both video encode and decode APIs while being unified across both Windows and Linux. The Video Codec SDK consists of the NVENCODE "NVENC" and NVDECODE "NVDEC" APIs with a variety of formats supported from older MPEG-2 up through H.265 and VP9 at a variety of bit depths and color formats.

  • AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan Driver Adds Transform Feedback, ~10% Vega Performance Boost

    AMD's Vulkan driver developers have done their first fresh code drop of the AMDVLK open-source Vulkan driver code in two weeks and it's a big push.

    Highlights of the AMDVLK update pushed out this morning for those using this official Radeon Vulkan driver alternative to Mesa RADV includes:

    - Their Vulkan transform feedback support appears in order. This is most notably useful for Wine/Proton Steam Play gamers with DXVK for mapping Direct3D to Vulkan. The Vulkan transform feedback support is necessary for handling Direct3D Stream-Out functionality. The RADV driver had already enabled this transform feedback support.

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There seems to be a mad rush at the beginning of every year to find ways to be more productive. New Year's resolutions, the itch to start the year off right, and of course, an "out with the old, in with the new" attitude all contribute to this. And the usual round of recommendations is heavily biased towards closed source and proprietary software. It doesn't have to be that way. Here's the seventh of my picks for 19 new (or new-to-you) open source tools to help you be more productive in 2019. Read more

Nginx vs Apache: Which Serves You Best in 2019?

For two decades Apache held sway over the web server market which is shrinking by the day. Not only has Nginx caught up with the oldest kid on the block, but it is currently the toast of many high traffic websites. Apache users might disagree here. That is why one should not jump to conclusions about which web server is better. The truth is that both form the core of complete web stacks (LAMP and LEMP), and the final choice boils down to individual needs. For instance, people running Drupal websites often call on Apache, whereas WordPress users seem to favor Nginx as much if not more. Accordingly, our goal is to help you understand your own requirements better rather than providing a one-size recommendation. Having said that, the following comparison between the two gives an accurate picture. Read more

Security: Updates, 'Smart' Things, Android Proprietary Software and Firefox Woes on Windows

  • Security updates for Friday
  • How Do You Handle Security in Your Smart Devices?
    Look around your daily life and that of your friends and family, and you’ll see that smart devices are beginning to take over our lives. But this also means an increase in a need for security, though not everyone realizes it, as discussed in a recent article on our IoT-related site. Are you aware of the need for security even when it’s IoT-related? How do you handle security in your smart devices?
  • A Vulnerability in ES File Explorer Exposes All of Your Files to Anyone on the Same Network
  • 2018 Roundup: Q1
    One of our major pain points over the years of dealing with injected DLLs has been that the vendor of the DLL is not always apparent to us. In general, our crash reports and telemetry pings only include the leaf name of the various DLLs on a user’s system. This is intentional on our part: we want to preserve user privacy. On the other hand, this severely limits our ability to determine which party is responsible for a particular DLL. One avenue for obtaining this information is to look at any digital signature that is embedded in the DLL. By examining the certificate that was used to sign the binary, we can extract the organization of the cert’s owner and include that with our crash reports and telemetry. In bug 1430857 I wrote a bunch of code that enables us to extract that information from signed binaries using the Windows Authenticode APIs. Originally, in that bug, all of that signature extraction work happened from within the browser itself, while it was running: It would gather the cert information on a background thread while the browser was running, and include those annotations in a subsequent crash dump, should such a thing occur.