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Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel Posts Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Feature Changes Ahead Of Linux 4.21

    With the time for new Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver feature material to enter DRM-Next for the Linux 4.21 kernel cycle quickly coming to a close, the Intel Open-Source Technology Center crew has sent in a final feature pull of material for this next kernel development cycle.

    As the DRM-Next feature cutoff happens a few weeks prior to the end of the current kernel cycle, in the days ahead will mark that point for Linux 4.21 with 4.20 marching along for debut around Christmas. The open-source Intel developers have already sent in a few feature updates in the past few weeks to DRM-Next while today was their final expected batch for 4.21.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.0 Bringing Big Improvements For Turing GPUs

    NVIDIA has quietly outed the key features they will be introducing with their upcoming Video Codec SDK 9.0 release.

    The NVIDIA Video Codec SDK for Linux users is the company's successor to VDPAU and offers both video encode and decode APIs while being unified across both Windows and Linux. The Video Codec SDK consists of the NVENCODE "NVENC" and NVDECODE "NVDEC" APIs with a variety of formats supported from older MPEG-2 up through H.265 and VP9 at a variety of bit depths and color formats.

  • AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan Driver Adds Transform Feedback, ~10% Vega Performance Boost

    AMD's Vulkan driver developers have done their first fresh code drop of the AMDVLK open-source Vulkan driver code in two weeks and it's a big push.

    Highlights of the AMDVLK update pushed out this morning for those using this official Radeon Vulkan driver alternative to Mesa RADV includes:

    - Their Vulkan transform feedback support appears in order. This is most notably useful for Wine/Proton Steam Play gamers with DXVK for mapping Direct3D to Vulkan. The Vulkan transform feedback support is necessary for handling Direct3D Stream-Out functionality. The RADV driver had already enabled this transform feedback support.

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