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Graphics: AMD, Vulkan and ARM

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 4.20 Picks Up 6 x 4K Display Support For Vega 20, Initial RX 590 Support Fixes

    Usually this late into a current Linux kernel development cycle the DRM graphics driver fixes don't tend to be too notable, but that's certainly not the case with today's batch of AMDGPU and TTM fixes sent off to the DRM tree.

    Highlights of the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver fixes today come down to:

    - Support for being able to drive six 4K displays with the upcoming Vega 20 GPUs... Up until now Vega 20 would top out at 4 x 4K displays due to the minimum dcf clock value set, but now that's been corrected with a one line patch that will allow up to six 4K displays to function with the upcoming Radeon Instinct Vega 20 products.

  • VK_KHR_shader_float_controls and Mesa support

    Khronos Group has published two new extensions for Vulkan: VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and VK_KHR_shader_float_controls. In this post, I will talk about VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which is the extension I have been implementing on Anvil driver, the open-source Intel Vulkan driver, as part of my job at Igalia. For information about VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and its implementation in Mesa, you can read Iago’s blogpost.

    The Vulkan Working Group has defined a new extension VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which allows applications to query and override the implementation’s default floating point behavior for rounding modes, denormals, signed zero and infinity. From the Vulkan application developer perspective, VK_shader_float_controls defines a new structure called VkPhysicalDeviceFloatControlsPropertiesKHR where the drivers expose the supported capabilities such as the rounding modes for each floating point data type, how the denormals are expected to be handled by the hardware (either flush to zero or preserve their bits) and if the value is a signed zero, infinity and NaN, whether it will preserve their bits.

  • ARM Posts New "Komeda" Linux DRM/KMS Display Driver

    ARM developers have posted their first public patches for the new "Komeda" display driver for the Linux kernel that offers DRM/KMS integration.

    ARM's Komeda display driver is for supporting the D71 and later display processors. The Mali D71 is a big redesign to ARM's display IP that is more modularized and offers new functionality compared to their older display processors. Those unfamiliar with the D71 hardware and features but curious can learn more via community.arm.com.

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An Initial Look At The Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Performance

One of the most exciting developments in the open-source Intel driver space this year was the Iris Gallium3D driver taking shape as what's destined to eventually succeed their "classic" i965 Mesa driver. With Iris Gallium3D maturing, here's a look at how the performance currently stacks up to their mature OpenGL driver. The Intel Iris Gallium3D driver is designed for Skylake (potentially Broadwell too) support and newer generations while being a forward-looking driver and utilizes their mature NIR compiler support. Iris holds much more performance potential than their classic Mesa driver albeit the developers haven't really taken to performance optimizations yet but rather getting the driver up and running, eliminating test suite failures, and getting to the point of feature parity with the i965 driver. Read more