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Servers: SUSE, Red Hat, Docker and Kubernetes

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  • Transformation: It’s Not Just for Caterpillars!
  • Red Hat: Industry 4.0 use cases will drive 5G rollout

    Industrial use cases reveal that there is money to be made from 5G but telcos must adapt their business models if they are to capitalise on this opportunity

  • Decipher Technology Studios Announces Red Hat ISV Business Partnership
  • Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux 7.5 Earns FIPS 140-2 Certification Renewal; Paul Smith Quoted

    The company said Nov. 8 the FIPS 140-2 security certification renewal serves to validate Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other products such as Ceph Storage, CloudForms and OpenStack Platform for public sector deployments.

    “Regardless of technological advances, protecting sensitive information remains a top priority for every government entity, from executive agencies to state-level organizations,” said Paul Smith, senior vice president and general manager for Red Hat’s public sector business in North America.

  • Docker CEO Continues to Grow Container Business Opportunities
  • ​CNAB: Docker and Microsoft's Cloud Native Application Bundle
  • Red Hat Shares ― Special edition: This year in open source
  • New Contributor Workshop Shanghai

    We recently completed our first New Contributor Summit in China, at the first KubeCon in China. It was very exciting to see all of the Chinese and Asian developers (plus a few folks from around the world) interested in becoming contributors. Over the course of a long day, they learned how, why, and where to contribute to Kubernetes, created a pull requests, attended a panel of current contributors, and got their CLAs signed.

    This was our second New Contributor Workshop (NCW), building on the one created and led by SIG Contributor Experience members in Copenhagen. Because of the audience, it was held in both Chinese and English, taking advantage of the superb simultranslation services the CNCF sponsored. Likewise, the NCW team included both English and Chinese-speaking members of the community: Yang Li, Xiang Peng (Peter) Zhao, Puja Abbassi, Noah Abrahams, Tim Pepper, Zach Corleissen, Sen Lu, and Josh Berkus. In addition to presenting and helping students, the bilingual members of the team translated all of the slides into Chinese. 51 students attended.

  • Minimum viable Kubernetes

    The appeal of Kubernetes is universal. Application development, operations and infrastructure teams recognise diverse reasons for its immediate utility and growing potential — a testament of Kubernetes’ empathetic design. Web apps, galvanised by the 12 factor pattern as well as microservice-structured applications find a native habitat in Kubernetes. Moreover, there is a growing list of analytics and data streaming applications, Function-as-a-Service platforms and deep/machine learning, frameworks that benefit from Kubernetes’ functionality. Add to the mix a deep desire to decouple applications from VMs, increase portability for hybrid cloud operations, and a voracious appetite from the business for continuous innovation. The intrinsic diversity of goals and expectations make the decision for the most appropriate Kubernetes solution challenging. Here, we will explore what constitutes a minimal viable Kubernetes environment from a developer and operations perspective.

Four key Kubernetes growth vectors to watch in the data center

  • Four key Kubernetes growth vectors to watch in the data center

    A little more than four years ago, in June 2014, Google open-sourced Kubernetes, the container orchestration platform based on software that manages the hundreds of thousands of servers that run Google.

    Kubernetes not only beat Apache Mesos and Docker SWARM in the container orchestration race, it has become arguably the hottest technology to emerge since the Linux operating system that commoditized enterprise UNIX operating systems and became the ubiquitous platform for everything from IoT to scale-out cloud computing. It’s no longer if Kubernetes, but how rapidly it will become the dominant way for enterprises to develop and deploy applications.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft and Google 'EEE' GNU/Linux

Games: Retro Gaming and Vambrace: Cold Soul Coming to GNU/Linux

  • Raspberry Pi and Retro Gaming | Choose Linux 3
    Jason finally discovers the bottomless well of potential that is the Raspberry Pi, and talks about his first experience with Raspbian. Then Joe and Jason take a nostalgic deep dive into retro gaming on both the Raspberry Pi and the Pinebook.
  • Vambrace: Cold Soul, the next title from Devespresso Games will support Linux
    Devespresso Games (The Coma) are working on a new game called Vambrace: Cold Soul, a narrative-driven fantasy adventure that will support Linux. It's inspired by games like Darkest Dungeon, Castlevania and more it certainly looks good. I've had access to it for a while to do some pre-release Linux testing for the studio and I've been pretty impressed with it. The developer has also been very responsive to feedback and so far the Linux version seems pretty solid. The inspiration from Darkest Dungeon is pretty clear, with the turn-based battles and graphical style of the characters as well as the atmosphere being all quite familiar. Very much its own game though, the narrative focus of it along with the town exploration is certainly very different.

Python: Pyro Probabilistic Programming Language and More

  • Pyro Probabilistic Programming Language Becomes Newest LF Deep Learning Project
    The LF Deep Learning Foundation (LF DL), a Linux Foundation project that supports and sustains open source innovation in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL), announces the Pyro project, started by Uber, as its newest incubation project. Built on top of the PyTorch framework, Pyro is a deep probabilistic programming framework that facilitates large-scale exploration of AI models, making deep learning model development and testing quicker and more seamless. This is the second project LF DL has voted in from Uber, following last December’s Horovod announcement. Pyro is used by large companies like Siemens, IBM, and Uber, and startups like Noodle.AI, in addition to Harvard University, MIT, Stanford University, University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, and The Broad Institute. At Uber, Pyro solves a range of problems including sensor fusion, time series forecasting, ad campaign optimization and data augmentation for deep image understanding.
  • Converting Python Scripts to Executable Files
    In this tutorial, we will explore the conversion of Python scripts to Windows executable files in four simple steps. Although there are many ways to do it, we'll be covering, according to popular opinion, the simplest one so far. This tutorial has been designed after reviewing many common errors that people face while performing this task, and hence contains detailed information to install and set up all the dependencies as well. Feel free to skip any step, if you already have those dependencies installed. Without any further ado, let's start.
  • Python Performance Optimization
    Resources are never sufficient to meet growing needs in most industries, and now especially in technology as it carves its way deeper into our lives. Technology makes life easier and more convenient and it is able to evolve and become better over time. This increased reliance on technology has come at the expense of the computing resources available. As a result, more powerful computers are being developed and the optimization of code has never been more crucial. Application performance requirements are rising more than our hardware can keep up with. To combat this, people have come up with many strategies to utilize resources more efficiently – Containerizing, Reactive (Asynchronous) Applications, etc.
  • Webinar Recording: “Demystifying Python’s async and await Keywords” with Michael Kennedy
    Yesterday we hosted a webinar with Michael Kennedy from Talk Python To Me podcasts and training presenting Demystifying Python’s async and await Keywords. Turned out to be the highest-rated webinar in 7 years of JetBrains’ webinars. Thanks Michael! The webinar recording is now available, as well as a repository with the Python code he showed and the slides he used.
  • Skipping tests depending on the Python version
    Sometimes we want to run certain tests only on a specific version of Python. Suppose you are migrating a large project from Python 2 to Python 3 and you know in advance that certain tests won't run under Python 3. Chances are that during the migration you are already using the six library. The six libraries have two boolean properties which are initialised to True depending on the Python version which is being used: PY2 when running under Python 2 and PY3 when running under Python 3.

Linux Foundation launches ELISA, an open source project for building safety-critical systems

Machines have a trust problem — particularly autonomous machines deployed in safety-critical scenarios, like industrial robots and driverless cars. In a pair of surveys published by the American Automobile Association last January and by Gallup in May, 63 percent of people reported feeling afraid to ride in a fully self-driving vehicle and more than half said they’d never choose to ride in one. Moreover, in a report published by analysts at Pew in 2017, 70 percent of Americans said they were concerned about robots performing tasks currently handled by humans. In an effort to allay those fears, the Linux Foundation today launched Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA), an open source project comprising tools intended to help companies build and certify Linux-based systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. In partnership with British chip designer Arm, BMW, autonomous platforms company Kuka, Linutronix, and Toyota, ELISA will work with certification and standardization bodies in “multiple industries” to establish ways Linux can form the foundation of safety-critical systems across industries. ELISA’s launch follows last year’s rollout of Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) 5.0, the newest version of a Linux Foundation project aimed at bringing open source technology to the automotive industry. Previous releases focused mainly on infotainment systems, but 5.0 introduced telematics and mapping solutions that allow OEMs to share mapping data generated by autonomous cars, in addition to offering improved security and a functional safety platform. Toyota and Amazon expressed early support; the former is using AGL in its 2018 Camry. Read more Slashdot: Linux Foundation Launches ELISA, an Open Source Project For Building Safety-Critical Systems