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OSS Leftovers

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  • Open source predictions for 2019

    Crystal ball? Are you there? Fine. I'll go it alone.

    2018 was a rollicking fun year for open source, filled with highs, lows, and plenty of in-between. But what will 2019 hold for Linux and open source software? Let's shrug off the continued introductory dialog and prognosticate.

  • Why Mozilla Matters

    Mozilla revenue rose by over $40 million USD in 2017 which sounds good until you notice that its expenses went up by over $80 million.

    Mozilla has filed its accounts for the financial year ended December 31st, 2017 and published them along with its annual report, The State of Mozilla 2017.

  • There’s BIG open source news on our 9th birthday

    Since those first days, we’ve frequently seen developers reach the #1 spot in various app stores. We’ve seen apps that have received millions of downloads, and app developers who have made a full time career out of mobile app development. But for many, it’s also a challenging time. The mobile app market has become over saturated. There has been a race-to-the-bottom in app pricing. New challenges extend up the development toolchain and impact the quality of top app engines.

    In this evolving industry landscape and these emerging challenges, change is good and necessary. With that in mind, we would like to introduce a big change for Corona. We have decided to get you — the developer community — more involved in Corona’s development, and open-source most of the engine. There are features you want, updates you need, and it’s simply time to get you more involved in Corona’s future. Corona Labs will continue to support the engine and going open source means more transparency to the process.

    We are certain you will have a lot of questions about how this will work, and as we have more to share, we will be continuously sharing new details with you. Also, feel free to discuss this in our community forums and in the CDN Slack.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO’s Latest Release Equips for 5G

    The European Telecommunication Standards Institute (ETSI) today released the latest version of its Open Source MANO (OSM) project. OSM is an operator-led group working on delivering an open source management and network orchestration (MANO) stack that aligns with ETSI NFV models. The latest code release from the group, Release FIVE, extends its capabilities to help operators toward 5G deployments.

    OSM released its first code in 2016 and now has around 110 organizations, namely vendors and operators, participating in the project. This includes Accedian, Aricent, Oracle, Saudi Telecom, University College London — which are just a handful of the 18 that have joined in the last six months.

    The group is developing a technology-agnostic stack that is enabled by a plugin framework. The newest code release furthers this framework toward transport technologies and maintains the project’s consistent modeling of NFV.

  • Why should CSPs embrace open source and OpenStack?

    What are the main motivators for CSPs to embrace open source, and how does OpenStack fit into a multi-cloud and increasingly cloud native architecture? A recent survey from TelecomTV of CSPs found that avoidance of vendor lock-in and decreasing time to market were amongst the main reasons for embracing open source. A comprehensive 91 per cent of CSPs said they are either already using OpenStack or plan to deploy it in the near future. However, a majority felt that working with the open source community is easier for the Tier One operators than it is for the smaller tier two and threes, and almost three-quarters felt there were simply too many open source projects. Given these findings, how should CSPs work with open source and OpenStack in particular? Two of the leading CSPs in North America join the panel to discuss their experiences and give advice to others.

  • Why you should be using open-source crypto wallets

    The last couple of years have been unexpectedly great in terms of popularizing cryptocurrencies as either means of payment or speculative investments. By now, it’s pretty common to find people who store their coins in software wallets. They are quick, easy to use, and very convenient for commerce. However, the issue at stake is that a very small amount of these wallets actually benefit from the security advantages of open source software. Therefore, this article aims to point out these bad choices and highlight the better alternatives.

    The faux-open source choices.

    If you randomly ask casual crypto enthusiasts about the software wallets they’re using, the most common responses you get include Jaxx, Exodus, and Coinomi. Though some of these do include parts that are open-sourced or borrow industry-standard elements, the final versions contain multiple additions to the code that cannot be reviewed by everybody in a GitHub repository.

    There are several reasons why people use an application like Jaxx: the mobility factor (you can have your wallet on your phone as well as on your home computer), the intuitive interface, the advanced functions (such as instant Shapeshift or Changelly conversions), and the effective marketing behind the efforts. Just the idea of managing your entire crypto portfolio within the UI of a single application is appealing to lots of enthusiasts.

  • Create your own free Adobe Creative Cloud with free and open source software

    Earlier this week, I talked about the muscle memory monopoly Adobe and other vendors have on users. As we become more and more experienced with these commercial products, we also become more tied to them.

    But they are expensive. Individual, non-student licenses for Adobe Creative Cloud can be upwards of $600 per year. While there are lower cost alternatives to many of the individual applications included in Creative Cloud, buying them can add up as well.

    A number of you reached out to me asking what you could do if you wanted the capabilities of Creative Cloud, but didn't want to spend the money. In this gallery, we'll look at the 11 main Creative Cloud products and find (mostly) workable substitutes.

  • Docker commits to open source, promises to put users into a ‘state of flow’

    Docker’s CTO said he wants the company’s customers to lose all track of time in a keynote that outlined how the firm plans to reach developers that are nowhere near being cloud native.

  • Docker Inc. Open Sources Kubernetes Configuration Tool

    At the DockerCon Europe 2018 conference, Docker Inc. today announced it will make Docker Compose for Kubernetes available as an open source project. Docker Compose for Kubernetes was developed by Docker Inc. to make it easier to configure Kubernetes clusters running on top of the Docker Enterprise platform; now it is available to the broader Kubernetes community.

    Company CTO Kal De told conference attendees that Docker Inc. would remain committed to leading the development of open source projects even as the company seeks to drive revenue via commercial software and services engagements with enterprise IT organizations. Today, Docker claims it has more than 650 commercial customers and is adding new customers at a rate of over 100 per quarter.

  • Preserving software’s legacy

    All throughout our lives we are reminded of events from the past. History teaches us about what happened before us to help us understand how society came to be as it is today. But today we live in a digital age, and while leaders, laws, wars and other parts of our history will always be important to know; what about software? Technology is everywhere and it is rapidly changing every day. Should we care about where it all started?

    The Software Heritage was launched with a mission to collect, preserve and share all software source code that is publicly available. It is currently working towards building the largest global source code archive ever. The Software Heritage was founded by the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation Inria, and it is backed by partners and supporters such as Crossminer, Qwant, Microsoft, Intel, Google and GitHub.

  • Living Open Source in Zambia

    In a previous article I've announced my sponsorship project, where I offered to help a motivated young Linux Professional getting certified. I found an ideal candidate, and he has taken the RHCSA exam, and now we're ready to take the next step.

    Santos Chibenga from Zambia is so engaged in the local Linux community in Zambia that we decided to host an event together: https://www.vieo.tv/event/linux-event-lusaka-zambia. In this event we will have local speakers, and I will educate nearly 200 participants to become LFCS certified. As we realised that this event was growing bigger than expected, we have opened the event for sponsors as well.

  • Toyota Builds Open-Source Car-Hacking Tool

    A Toyota security researcher on his flight from Japan here to London carried on-board a portable steel attaché case that houses the carmaker's new vehicle cybersecurity testing tool.

    Takuya Yoshida, a member of Toyota's InfoTechnology Center, along with his Toyota colleague Tsuyoshi Toyama, are part of the team that developed the new tool, called PASTA (Portable Automotive Security Testbed), an open-source testing platform for researchers and budding car hacking experts. The researchers here today demonstrated the tool, and said Toyota plans to share the specifications on Github, as well as sell the fully built system in Japan initially.

  • AWS is fashionably (or frustratingly) late to open source, but ready to party

    To the scowling, sleep-deprived developers sniping at Amazon Web Services Inc. for slacking on open source: AWS is fed up. It’s put together a team devoted to upping open-source activity and is steadily contributing new software.

    “We’re getting criticized for not making enough contributions,” said Adrian Cockcroft ‏(pictured), vice president of cloud architecture strategy at AWS. “But we’ve been making more, and we’re making more, and we’ll just keep making more contributions until people give credit for it.”

  • "Joinup, the ideal dissemination platform for our open source solutions." A testimonial from Francesca Bria from the Barcelona City Council

     

    The Barcelona City Council is actively promoting the use and reuse of free software, open source solutions and open standards beyond their City Hall. This is outlined in the Barcelona Digital City strategy set by the Commissioner for Technology and Digital Innovation. To support this strategy, Barcelona has created an open source team to help internal departments that need to migrate to open source, providing them with digitally clear ethical standards, guidelines and best practices, as well as, supporting them throughout the whole process, including licencing and publishing the solutions on the municipal’s GitHub space. The Barcelona City Council Open Source Team also started to actively promote a citywide FLOSS community and the dissemination of their solutions on platforms such as Joinup, to ensure they reach the maximum number of people and public sector organisations.

  • Highlights from the 2018 NYC DISC Sprint

    DISC Committee members went all out to spread the word for this Sprint and the effort really paid off!

    We reached out to folks across a number of different channels including dev/color, Techqueria, Taiwanese Data Professionals, and PyLadies. Even managed to include a blurb at PyData NYC during the Panel Discussion: My First Open Source Contribution.

  • How to reverse a list in Python
  • Sending Emails With Python

    You probably found this tutorial because you want to send emails using Python. Perhaps you want to receive email reminders from your code, send a confirmation email to users when they create an account, or send emails to members of your organization to remind them to pay their dues. Sending emails manually is a time-consuming and error-prone task, but it’s easy to automate with Python.

More in Tux Machines

IBM-Red Hat "Merger" Update

  • Red Hat sets date for stockholders to vote on IBM merger
    Open source solutions provider Red Hat has set a special meeting on 16 January for stockholders to consider and vote on IBM's proposed acquisition of the company. On 28 October, IBM and Red hat announced an agreement and plan of merger which would see IBM acquire Red Hat for $190.00 per share in an all-cash transaction. "The board of directors of Red Hat recommends that stockholders vote in favour of the merger with IBM," the company said in a statement on 11 December.
  • IBM exec: Why buying Red Hat is better than partnership

Linux Foundation: ONAP, the Joint Development Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

  • Linux Foundation's ONAP 'Casablanca' Enables 5G Management
    Today’s topics include the Linux Foundation adding new features to ONAP Casablanca for 5G enablement, and Censys raising seed money to expand internet scanning for threat hunting. The Linux Foundation's LF Networking project group last week took the next step in delivering an open-source platform to enable telecom providers to deploy next-generation network services.
  • The Joint Development Foundation Joins the Linux Foundation Family to Drive Adoption of Open Source and Standards
    The Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation today announced an agreement to bring the Joint Development Foundation into the Linux Foundation family to make it easier to collaborate through both open source and standards development. The Joint Development Foundation is a nonprofit that provides a “standards organization in a box” to enable groups to quickly establish projects. With today’s news, the Linux Foundation and the Joint Development Foundation plan to provide greater capabilities for communities to engage in open source and standards development to speed industry adoption. “Linux Foundation communities have been engaged in developing open standards and specifications around Linux since day one and more recently with newer efforts such as OpenChain and the Open Container Initiative to collectively solve technical challenges,” said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation. “Leveraging the capabilities of the Joint Development Foundation will enable us to provide open source projects with another path to standardization, driving greater industry adoption of standards and specifications to speed adoption.”
  • How CNCF Is Growing the Cloud Landscape at KubeCon
    Thousands of developers, vendors and end users alike are descending on Seattle from Dec. 11-13 for the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event. They are all here to learn and talk about the growing cloud native landscape, anchored by the Kubernetes container orchestration system. Among those at KubeCon is Chris Aniszczyk, Chief Operating Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). In a video interview with eWEEK, Aniszczyk provides insight into the KubeCon event as well as highlighting the current and future direction of the CNCF, which now hosts 31 different open-source efforts. [...] Aniszczyk is also particularly enthusiastic about the Envoy project, which was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic. Among the organizations that are now using Envoy are Square, Stripe, Amazon and Google.

today's howtos

Adobe and GNU/Linux