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Mark Shuttleworth: Sensory immersion

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Ubuntu

Joi Ito is one of the folks I’ve enjoyed meeting most in recent times, though we’ve not spent much time together I’ve learned a ton every time - I hope I can return the favour some day! It was Joi who first described the World of Warcraft scene to me. I was impressed with the scale of it all. But what really intrigued me was Joi’s description of how he’s wiring up a room in his house to be a sort of portal into that other virtual world. Sound, perhaps other sensory indicators, will give anyone in that room a feeling of being immersed in WoW.

Second Life of course brings a new twist to the idea of immersion, though for now it’s immersion on the virtual side of the looking glass. I think there’s going to be a need for innovation around the ways we blur the lines between real and virtual worlds.

Full Post.

Also: Ubuntu Weekly News

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