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Building a Mandriva 2005 Desktop

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MDV
HowTos

This time we are going to build a complete box in one shot. Of course this makes the How-To a bit more detailed and adds quite a few more screenshots. I think it works better though. So for anyone that's completely new to Mandriva, you will have a fully funtional box when you're done with this How-to. We are going to go through the install, configuring sources, and updting the box. Then we'll also add all the software to allow you to access all the multimedia that's available on the web.

So follow along and lets get it going!!!

Welcome to the workstation/desktop build. If you are here, I assume that this is your first time installing Linux. Otherwise you would be up and running already. Mandriva (MDV) is very easy to install and configure. The entire install takes about 2 hours from start to finish. It's actually easier than a Windows XP install.

The first thing we need to do is get the media. MDV has a download page on the main site. They try to get you to join the club but it isn't necessary. I would recommend you hold off until you are sure you want to run MDV software for a while. (That realization will be about 10 minutes after you run MDV the first time.) Anyways, clear about 2.5GB of space off your drive, create a folder and start the download of the ISO images. It's a simple matter of clicking HERE and then clicking on the Download link. Go tho the bottom of the page and click on one of the "Click Here" bottons. Then on the next page click on the "Download via Public Mirrors 3CD only Version". This will take you to a page full of Mirror listings. Pick one and begin the download. I used to start all three ISO's downloading and go to bed. When you wake up you'll have three new ISO's in the folder. Use whatever software you use to burn Cd's to burn the three images to disks. If you need help just read your software's manual for burning ISO images. Its pretty easy.

Full Howto.

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