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Reiser Hid Car & Tried to Elude Police After Wife Disappeared

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Reiser

Murder defendant Hans Reiser of Oakland hid his car in a quiet West Berkeley neighborhood after his wife Nina Reiser disappeared in September, an Oakland police officer said today in Alameda County Superior Court.

Testifying in the third day of a preliminary hearing that will determine whether there's enough evidence to order Hans Reiser, 43, to stand trial, Officer Gino Guerrero said Reiser engaged in a lengthy cat-and-mouse game with surveillance officers who were trailing him on the evening of Sept. 18, 15 days after Nina Reiser was last seen alive.

During a break in today's hearing, prosecutor Greg Dolge said Hans Reiser was "avoiding police at all costs" and his behavior is "evidence of a guilty conscience."

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An Oakland computer programmer charged with murdering his wife tried to elude police surveillance in the weeks after she disappeared in September, a police officer assigned to track the defendant testified today.

Hans Reiser, 42, laughed numerous times and whispered into his attorney's ear as Oakland police Officer Eugene Guerrero described how 12 officers in unmarked cars and a plane tracked the defendant's movements on Sept. 18, two weeks after his wife disappeared.

Reiser repeatedly paced up and down streets in downtown Oakland after leaving a court hearing for his children, Guerrero said.

Reiser then got into a BMW driven by a friend, who checked the car as if he was looking for tracking devices, Guerrero said.

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UPDATE: Few More Details Here.

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