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Top Linux photo managers side-by-side

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Software

While a full-fledged image editor may be the best way to repair digital photos, most of the time users need only to make minor touch-ups; it is organizing, sorting, and finding a specific photo that eat up all the time. For that task, as is often the case with Linux, you have several options to choose from. Let's take a look at the major photo management applications, and compare them side by side.

The two big desktop environment projects each have an affiliated photo management app -- KDE has DigiKam, and GNOME has F-Spot. Both can be described as "iPhoto clones" -- mimicking the user interface of Apple's consumer-level photo app. They let you browse through your photos with a grid of thumbnail images, and can import pictures from USB digital cameras, group them into albums, add keywords and tags, and export pictures to popular photo-sharing Web sites.

We'll take a look at DigiKam and F-Spot, then examine some lesser-known alternatives, including Google's proprietary Picasa.

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