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Servers/Containers Leftovers

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  • Six Hot Linux Certifications for 2019

    Linux, the most widely-used open source operating system (OS), dominates the web server market. According to IDC, commercial and non-commercial Linux deployments in the worldwide enterprise segment registered considerable growth in 2017. It is now the standard for enterprise applications.

  • Linux: Cornerstone For Software-Defined Infrastructure

    Linux is ever more prevalent in SAP and non-SAP environments. Recent figures, published by IDC, are testimony to record sales numbers. In fact, the majority of systems already come with Linux pre-installed.

    Moreover, Linux has long since established itself in SAP environments. The shift from Unix to Linux of NetWeaver-based system with Any-DBs, the Hana consolidation and the use of Hana-based SAP applications contributed to the almost fixed position of Linux.

  • Why Replace Windows® Server?

    Linux powers the servers that run 96.5% of the top web domains in the world (W3Cook) – and for good reason. Like moving to the cloud, swapping your Windows Server for a Linux one can save a tidy sum on your budget. You can say goodbye to licensing costs (i.e. CALs). Besides, many admins simply prefer working with Unix-based operating systems and many would argue Linux is more scalable and performant.

  • Security Considerations for Container Runtimes
  • Measuring container security

    There are a lot of claims regarding the relative security of containers versus virtual machines (VMs), but there has been little in the way of actually trying to measure those differences. James Bottomley gave a talk in the refereed track of the 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) that described work that targets filling in that gap. He and his colleagues have come up with a measure that, while not perfect, gives a starting point for further efforts.

    Bottomley introduced himself as a "container evangelist" for IBM. He used to help convert businesses to becoming part of the open-source community. Working at Parallels on that is how he got involved with containers. He is also a kernel developer and maintainer.

  • A Container Hacker’s Guide to Living Off of the Land

    Sometimes as a pentester you find yourself in tricky situations. Depending on the type of engagement, you might want to try to avoid making a lot of noise on the network if possible. This blog post is going to talk about two techniques to use to gather information on your target while avoiding making too much noise as they pertain to container hacking. But for these to be useful, some other things have to have happened first.

  • Kubernetes in 2019: 6 developments to expect

    Plenty of emerging technologies get hyped. Few seem to gain the tangible kind of enthusiasm and traction that Kubernetes has enjoyed to this point. 

    Yet for all of the attention paid to the container orchestration tool, widespread usage is really just beginning. Kubernetes resides at an increasingly high-traffic intersection of legacy and modern software development. So expect 2019 to include a mix of Kubernetes-related trends as more and more companies see Kubernetes as a signpost indicating that turn toward “modern” is imminent. 

    Here are six particular developments to anticipate in the new year.

  • Why moving from a monolithic architecture to microservices is so hard, Gitlab’s Jason Plum breaks it down [KubeCon+CNC Talk]

    Last week, at the KubeCon+CloudNativeCon North America 2018, Jason Plum, Sr. software engineer, distribution at GitLab spoke about GitLab, Omnibus, and the concept of monolith and its downsides. He spent the last year working on the cloud native helm charts and breaking out a complicated pile of code.

    This article highlights few insights from Jason Plum’s talk on Monolith to Microservice: Pitchforks Not Included at the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Stereoscopic cam board taps Raspberry Pi CM4

StereoPi is going to Crowd Supply to pitch an open-spec “StereoPi v2” stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi CM4. The v2 adds a Type-C port and advances to GbE and 802.11ac. In Dec. 2019, Russia-based Virt2real found Crowd Supply success with a StereoPi stereoscopic camera board that works with the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 (CM3). Now operating under the StereoPi name, the company has posted a Crowd Supply page for a second-gen model that uses the new Raspberry Pi CM4. Read more

8 Tools to Easily Create a Custom Linux Distro

When there are so many Linux distros out there, you are probably wondering why someone would want to create their own distro instead of getting a readymade one. While in most cases a readymade distro is fine, if you want to have a distro that is 100 percent tailored to your needs (or your mum or dad’s needs), you may have to create your own custom Linux distro. With the right tools, creating your own Linux distro isn’t as hard as it seems, though it takes time for sure. There are many tools for the purpose – some of them are universal, and some of them are distro-specific. Here are eight of them. Read more

today's leftovers

  • 7 Halloween-themed Retro-Games for RetroPie - YouTube

    Halloween is my favorite holiday! And to celebrate, here are 7 great retro games that are perfect for the occasion. These are some great spooky-fun games to add to your RetroPie.

  • Friends of GNOME Update – October 2020

    We’re working with our friends at KDE on the Linux Application Summit (LAS). This event takes place November 12 – 14. It will be online this year. The event will cover all things to do with apps in a Linux environment. Registration is open! LAS is also looking for volunteers, so if you’d like to get involved, please fill out this form. Registration for GNOME.Asia is open! The GNOME.Asia Summit 2020 will be taking place online on November 24 – 26. While the conference is centered around the GNOME Project, there will be talks, workshops, and Birds of a Feather sessions for everyone interested in free and open source software. You can register online.

  • Collabora developers mentor successful GSoC Projects

    Autumn is just around the corner. For many participants in the GSoC 2020, a busy and instructive summer full of hacking on open source projects came to an end a few weeks ago. Commits have been contributed and final reports have been written. This year experienced Collabora Productivity developers were again mentors for various projects of the Google Summer of Code for the LibreOffice project. Here are some examples of projects our team helped to succeed!

  • OpenBehavior: A Rich Directory for Open-source Behavioral Neuroscience Projects

    OpenBehavior is an open-source repository for tools, software, projects and scripts that are dedicated for behavioral neuroscience research. The main goal is to promote and accelerate the collaboration of open-source neuroscience projects, neuroscience researchers and developers. Currently, OpenBehavior has 145 projects and active community of developers and research who are supporting this project. The project is founded and maintained by a group of researchers and professors. It started 2016 by Mark Lubach (PhD) and Alexxai Karvitz (PhD). The project is funded by NASA DC Space Grant Consortium to ML, Summer 2017. However, It's still looking for more support as it's 100% volunteer work.

  • Taskcluster's DB (Part 1) - Azure to Postgres [Ed: Mozilla flirtations with Microsoft again]

    This is a deep-dive into some of the implementation details of Taskcluster. Taskcluster is a platform for building continuous integration, continuous deployment, and software-release processes. It’s an open source project that began life at Mozilla, supporting the Firefox build, test, and release systems. The Taskcluster “services” are a collection of microservices that handle distinct tasks: the queue coordinates tasks; the worker-manager creates and manages workers to execute tasks; the auth service authenticates API requests; and so on.

  • Open Source Drive-Thru Contributors [Ed: Openwashing agenda by VM Brasseur or how to 'farm' a community for 'free labour']

    VM Brasseur explains open source “drive-thru contributions” and explores how the process can be improved. In the ongoing efforts to create a sustainable free and open source software ecosystem—one where projects receive the attention they need without burning out their maintainers in the process—a lot of attention has justifiably fallen on increasing the number of FOSS contributors. Much of the discussion around increasing contributors assumes that the primary goal is to get contributors who will stick around and become community members and maintainers. It's certainly true that many hands make light work, and the more maintainers a project has the less likely it is that any one of them will bear the brunt of the work and burn out. But, this isn't the only way to support project sustainability through contributions. Another approach is to optimize your project for drive-thru contributors.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (linux-4.19), Fedora (tcpreplay, xen, and yubihsm-shell), SUSE (pacemaker), and Ubuntu (gosa and pam-python).

  • Set up CUPS Print Server in Ubuntu 20.04 – Linux Hint

    The job of a print server is to accept print requests from multiple machines, process those requests, and then send them to the specified printer for serving those requests. CUPS is a utility designed for Linux operating systems that can turn a regular computer system into a print server. This article provides a method for setting up the CUPS print server in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Ubuntu Unity Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains how to switch Ubuntu 20.10 user interface back to Unity rather than GNOME. This is for computer users who prefer Ubuntu with its innovative Unity appearance that found in version 10.04 LTS and 16.10. Now let's have fun!