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Linux pilot a success

During a pilot project for Linux Simple Internet Server (SIS) for 20 companies conducted by the National Electronics and Computer Technology Centre (Nectec), SMEs found that they could save on software licensing costs by up to 50,000 baht.

The Linux SIS project ran for six months, from May to October 2006 with 20 participants who were system integrators (SIs) and SMEs.

According to Nectec deputy director Dr Kwan Siththani, the project evaluation found that most participants favoured Linux SIS for managing Intranet mail, for file sharing, and as a web proxy and they were likely to shift to Linux SIS implementation in their organisations.

Dr Kwan noted that success factors for the project included executives' policies in pushing open source utilisation in both SIs and SMEs. It also learned that SIs should select people who were interested and ready to learn about Linux server while SIs had concerns about after-sales service.

In terms of cost savings, it found that most SMEs who ran Linux SIS could really save from 5,000 to 50,000 baht on the cost of a software licence, but...

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By the time you read this you will be able to download Psiphon, software developed at the University of Toronto in Canada that will allow a user to jump over or tunnel under a government firewall, guaranteeing that it will immediately be banned in a number of countries.

It works by allowing one user in, say a country without any restrictions, to set up an account for someone in a country that has them. The target user can then surf the Internet without restrictions.

This raises the old issue of basic human rights versus the right of a nation state to impose restrictions on them. Article 19 of the Declaration of Human Rights states that "Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers."

The biggest violators of this paragraph are typically listed as China, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran and Egypt.

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