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Nothing Says Hot Like Babes Wearing Shiny Plastic

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Hardware

The use of booth babes in trade shows is nothing new. However, Computex uses booth babes for more than just decoration. Unlike other trade shows where the girls just stand around and look good, the babes are Computex can be divided into four working groups.

The first group is the booth babe that we're all use to. They stand around the booth in shiny plastic clothing, next to the products the company wants to promote.

The second group of booth babes are the demo babes. This group has to be more than just eye candy because they have to go on stage and do product demos and presentations.

The 3rd group of Computex booth babes are the roaming floor babes. Unlike E3, where booth babes stay at their booth, Computex allows booth babes to roam around the convention center to get people to come to their booth.

Finally we have the roaming demo babes. These girls travel to different booths to do product demos for partnered companies.

I asked the VIA girls how it felt to have their presentation interrupted by a bunch of roaming floor babes from a rival company? Their reply was "We don't care, we're better looking."

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