Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux Muscles Into M$'s Space

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Is Linux a better choice for business than, say, a proprietary operating system such as Microsoft Windows? The debate, full of passion and conviction, rages on both sides of this issue. Over the past several years, Linux has elevated itself as a respectable competitor despite Microsoft's dominance in the operating systems market. Linux is used extensively in today's business operating platforms, in Web servers, the Domain Name System, FTP, e-mail, firewalls, Web hosting, network monitoring and desktop applications, for example. Some form of Linux is used in nearly 80 percent of companies today. Most of them deploy it from a server level, and interest in desktop functionality is growing. The rapid migration of Linux inside global businesses and government agencies is likely related to the increase in quality, security and cost-effectiveness that Linux provides.

Of course, there are arguments from both sides. But when you compare Linux and Windows applications feature for feature, there is very little, if anything, that Microsoft has that Linux hasn't yet perfected.

Security and reliability are, of course, another concern. How can migrating businesses be sure that the security and reliability of their networks will, at the very least, stay intact? Looking at some facts and figures provides a good start. In the past few years, Microsoft has experienced near-catastrophic exploitations with the MyDoom, Nimda and MS Blaster worms. These system exploitations affected countless users and cost individuals, corporations and government agencies millions of dollars in damages and downtime. Since then, Microsoft has had to account for the inadvertent release of part of its sanctified source code, as well as the much-publicized Internet Explorer vulnerabilities that have forced many users to change their preferred Web browsers. In response, Microsoft attempted to heighten security on all applications to prevent further incidents.

It's not as if Linux hasn't also had its share of vulnerabilities. The notable difference, though, is in the initial discovery and patching of existing vulnerabilities. Vulnerabilities within a code are, for the most part, inevitable, but users will find with Linux that vulnerabilities are identified and patches are released quickly, in many cases before users are even aware that there's a problem. Moreover, the Linux community, as opposed to proprietary vendors, provides innate security enhancements and affords a substantial number of resources from developers in the community to ensure that even seemingly insignificant security flaws are properly addressed.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

Ruby 2.2.0 Released

We are pleased to announce the release of Ruby 2.2.0. Ruby 2.2 includes many new features and improvements for the increasingly diverse and expanding demands for Ruby. Read more

2014 Catalyst Linux Graphics Benchmarks Year-In-Review

With the year quickly coming to an end, it's time to do our year-end driver recap benchmarks from the year for the proprietary AMD and NVIDIA graphics drivers as well as the open-source drivers. To get things started, here's benchmarks done of the official AMD Catalyst Linux releases of 2014 and testing these drivers on three different graphics cards. Read more

From Red Hat's CEO: Reflecting on a 'great year,' looking to '15

It is confirmed: 2014 has been a great year for Red Hat. [On Dec. 18], we announced third quarter results of our fiscal year 2015 and, with that, celebrated our 51st consecutive quarter of revenue growth - more than 12 years of consecutive revenue growth. Thank you to the team of Red Hat customers, partners, open source contributors, and associates around the world, for helping us propel Red Hat to new heights. While 2014 has been a fantastic year for Red Hat, it has also been a banner year for open source. Read more Also: Red Hat Tech Exchange highlights: Architect, Implement, Enable

Open Source's 2014: MS 'cancer' embrace, NASDAQ listings, and a quiet dog

Ho hum. Another year, another slew of open source announcements that prove the once-maligned development methodology is now so mainstream as to be tedious. Running most of the world’s most powerful supercomputers? Been there, done that. Giving retailers the ability to deliver highly customized paper coupons to consumers based on warehouse inventory nearby? So 2013! And yet in 2014 we had a few events in open source that managed to surprise us, and suggest an even brighter future. Read more