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Search Next or Backwards and Goto Line Tips for VIM

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HowTos

To search in vim is very simple, even a noob vim user know that,

/keyword

To search for next?

simply follow by pressing n for next keyword match point and search backward with shift+n or N.

Wanna highlight the keyword and search for next keyword match point?
Place your cursor at the desire word, and press shift 8(8 not at number pad) or *.

To highlight the keyword search?

Full Story.

Gobbeldy Schmockel

Just as I suspected. Vi advocates cannot communicate with humans:

Quote:
even a noob vim user know that

Quote:
Place your cursor at the desire word

Quote:
While opening the file sample.cc, I wanna goto line 165, which originally mention at here before.

Of course, you know why they cannot communicate and why man pages are so hard to decipher? It's because the writers are using vi.

When every fibre of your being is focussed on remembering key bindings, how can you even begin to think about what you are writing?

For seekers only

re: Gobbeldy Schmockel

Quote:

When every fibre of your being is focussed on remembering key bindings, how can you even begin to think about what you are writing?

teehee! I often shutter at some of the grammer mistakes I see in some of the posts I link to and there are times they are so thick you can barely make out what the 'author' is trying to say. I try not to make too many myself, but there isn't an article written by me in which I'm not still finding mistakes. Writing is harder than it looks. Big Grin

Vi was the first terminal editor I learned. In fact, it's probably the only console editor I learned. I still use it for quick config file edits. I never learned all (or even most) of the key-bindings. I learned enough to do quick edits. I write my stories in kwrite. I like it because it is a bit more primitive than some of the others, with the main advantage being it doesn't code the line breaks like even Vi does. But I still like Vi for those quick edits.

In fact, I believe everyone should learn the few commands needed to use Vi for editing. There are still a few distros out there that only ship with Vi. What if you needed to edit the xorg.conf file to get into X and Vi is all that's available?

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

The early pioneer days are over

- get used to it

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There are still a few distros out there that only ship with Vi. What if you needed to edit the xorg.conf file to get into X and Vi is all that's available?

That's easy. I don't do distros which are that unevolved. Like I don't use software that's stuck in the '80s.

----
I try to take one day at a time -- but sometimes several days attack me at once - Ashleigh Brilliant

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