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Software: Strawberry, GNU (GCC, GNUstep and Bash), The fish Shell and Kiwi TCMS

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  • Strawberry – audio player and music collection organizer

    I’m a massive music fan with a large collection of CDs consisting mostly of classical, country, blues, and pop. Streaming services fills in for other music genres, so I basically dabble with a wide range of music. Linux is blessed with a mouthwatering array of excellent open source music players. But I’m always on the look out for fresh, eclectic, and innovative music players.

    Strawberry is an audio player and music collection organizer. It was originally forked from Clementine. The main goal was to create a player for playing local music files that looked a bit more like Amarok with advanced soundcard options. The music player is designed for music collectors, audio enthusiasts and audiophiles. The name is inspired by the band Strawbs.

    Strawberry saw its first release in April 2018, whereas Clementine hasn’t seen a formal release in a few years, but it’s still in development. I’ve been following the development of Strawberry with earnest, but until recently there was an important feature missing from this music player. That’s scrobbling. To “scrobble” a song means that when you listen to it, the name of the song is sent to a web site (such as Last.fm) and added to your music profile. Strawberry’s latest build offers support for Last.fm, Libre.fm, and Listenbrainz.

  • GCC 9 Status report (2019-01-07), trunk in regression and documentation fixes mode
  • GCC 9 Enters Its Final Stage Of Development, Releasing Around April

    SUSE's Richard Biener announced this morning that "stage three" development on GCC 9 is now over, which means all that's left before releasing it as GCC 9.1 is to carry out more regression and documentation fixes.

  • ANN: GNUstep GUI 0.27.0
  • GNUstep Starts 2019 With Improvements To This Open-Source Apple Cocoa Implementation

    GNUstep, the long-standing implementation of Apple's Cocoa/Objective-C frameworks as open-source and supported on Linux, BSDs, and other platforms, started off 2019 with some new releases. GNUstep GUI 0.27, GNUstep Base 1.26, and GNUstep GUI Backend 0.27 are the new releases out today.

    GNUstep 1.26.0 as the base library has improved UTF-8 checks, support for TLS SNI, improved XML parsing, better internationalization handling, improvements to stack trace handling, and various other low-level library improvements and bug fixes.

  • Bash-5.0 release available
  • Bash 5.0 Release Candidate Packing Many Changes & A Lot Of Fixes

    The release candidate of the upcoming GNU Bash 5.0 shell release is now available. Bash 5.0 is packing various fixes over Bash 4.4 but also a number of new features and improvements to better conform to POSIX specifications.

  • fish Shell Becomes More Awesome With 3.0 Release

    The fish Shell is “a smart and user-friendly command-line shell for Linux, macOS, and the rest of the family”. fish is a more modern shell with the goal of being more interactive and more user-friendly than older shells. Unlike its competitors, fish is not based on the Bourne shell or the C shell but attempts to blaze its own path.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.4

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.4! This is a security, improvement and bug-fix update that includes new versions of Django, Patternfly and other dependencies. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org!

GNU ed 1.15 released

  • GNU ed 1.15 released!

    Last week, GNU ed, a line-oriented text editor, released GNU ed 1.15. GNU ed is used to create, display, modify and otherwise manipulate text files, both interactively and via shell scripts.

    Red, a restricted version of ed, can only edit files in the current directory and cannot execute shell commands. Ed is the “standard” text editor and the original editor for Unix. For most purposes, however, it is superseded by full-screen editors such as GNU Emacs or GNU Moe.

More on Bash

Bash 5.0 released

Late coverage by Kay Ewbank

  • Bash 5 Adds New Shell Variables

    The fifth major version of Bash, the UNIX/Linux scripting shell has arrived. The new release has fixed a variety of bugs from the previous version, and has also added new features and improvements to better conform to POSIX specifications.

    Bash is the GNU Project's Bourne Again SHell, a complete implementation of the POSIX shell spec. It also comes with interactive command line editing, job control on architectures that support it, csh-like features such as history substitution and brace expansion.

And much belated coverage

  • Bash shell utility turns 5.0

    A few months prior to celebrating the 30th birthday of the Bash command language interpreter, the GNU Project has released Bash 5.0, featuring bug fixes and new shell variables.

    As we look forward to the release of Linux Kernel 5.0 in the coming weeks, we can enjoy another venerable open source technology reaching the 5.0 milestone: the Bash shell utility. The GNU Project has launched the public version 5.0 of GNU/Linux’s default command language interpreter. Bash 5.0 adds new shell variables and other features and also repairs several major bugs.

    New shell variables in Bash 5.0 include BASH_ARGV0, which “expands to $0 and sets $0 on assignment,” says the project. The EPOCHSECONDS variable expands to the time in seconds since the Unix epoch, and EPOCHREALTIME does the same, but with microsecond granularity.

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Get started with Roland, a random selection tool for the command line

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Nginx vs Apache: Which Serves You Best in 2019?

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Security: Updates, 'Smart' Things, Android Proprietary Software and Firefox Woes on Windows

  • Security updates for Friday
  • How Do You Handle Security in Your Smart Devices?
    Look around your daily life and that of your friends and family, and you’ll see that smart devices are beginning to take over our lives. But this also means an increase in a need for security, though not everyone realizes it, as discussed in a recent article on our IoT-related site. Are you aware of the need for security even when it’s IoT-related? How do you handle security in your smart devices?
  • A Vulnerability in ES File Explorer Exposes All of Your Files to Anyone on the Same Network
  • 2018 Roundup: Q1
    One of our major pain points over the years of dealing with injected DLLs has been that the vendor of the DLL is not always apparent to us. In general, our crash reports and telemetry pings only include the leaf name of the various DLLs on a user’s system. This is intentional on our part: we want to preserve user privacy. On the other hand, this severely limits our ability to determine which party is responsible for a particular DLL. One avenue for obtaining this information is to look at any digital signature that is embedded in the DLL. By examining the certificate that was used to sign the binary, we can extract the organization of the cert’s owner and include that with our crash reports and telemetry. In bug 1430857 I wrote a bunch of code that enables us to extract that information from signed binaries using the Windows Authenticode APIs. Originally, in that bug, all of that signature extraction work happened from within the browser itself, while it was running: It would gather the cert information on a background thread while the browser was running, and include those annotations in a subsequent crash dump, should such a thing occur.