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Python News and Examples

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  • Programming language of the year? Python is standout in latest rankings

    Python gained 3.62 percentage points year over year in Tiobe's January 2019 index, beating rises by Visual Basic .NET and Java, the second and third biggest gainers. Python was created in 1989 by Dutch programmer Guido van Rossum, who relinquished his role as Python's 'Benevolent dictator for life' in July.

    Python entered the top three in Tiobe's popularity index in September and thanks to its use in a growing number of fields should stay there for some time, alongside mainstays Java, C, and C++, which have been in the top three for two decades.

    Python, it seems, is a hit with everyone. As Tiobe notes, it's often the first language taught at universities and it's the go-to language for statistical analysis, machine learning, scripting, web programming, and scientific computing.

  • Python del Statement

    In this tutorial, you will learn to use the del keyword with the help of examples.

  • FizzBuzz in Python with nested conditional expressions and a generator expression

    The FizzBuzz problem [1] is known to those who test/interview programming candidates, as one simple way to filter out unsuitable people early. One keeps on coming across mentions of it on tech sites.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Evan's Remains, Path of Titans, GIGABUSTER, SpriteStack

Shrinking Linux Attack Surfaces

Often, a kernel developer will try to reduce the size of an attack surface against Linux, even if it can't be closed entirely. It's generally a toss-up whether such a patch makes it into the kernel. Linus Torvalds always prefers security patches that really close a hole, rather than just give attackers a slightly harder time of it. Matthew Garrett recognized that userspace applications might have secret data that might be sitting in RAM at any given time, and that those applications might want to wipe that data clean so no one could look at it. There were various ways to do this already in the kernel, as Matthew pointed out. An application could use mlock() to prevent its memory contents from being pushed into swap, where it might be read more easily by attackers. An application also could use atexit() to cause its memory to be thoroughly overwritten when the application exited, thus leaving no secret data in the general pool of available RAM. The problem, Matthew pointed out, came if an attacker was able to reboot the system at a critical moment—say, before the user's data could be safely overwritten. If attackers then booted into a different OS, they might be able to examine the data still stored in RAM, left over from the previously running Linux system. As Matthew also noted, the existing way to prevent even that was to tell the UEFI firmware to wipe system memory before booting to another OS, but this would dramatically increase the amount of time it took to reboot. And if the good guys had won out over the attackers, forcing them to wait a long time for a reboot could be considered a denial of service attack—or at least downright annoying. Read more

Concept of Hard Links in Linux Explained

Learn the concept of hard links in Linux and its association with inodes in this tutorial. Read more

today's leftovers

  • NHS admits Windows XP is still running on more than 2,000 systems

    However, in response to a written parliamentary question from shadow Cabinet Office minister Jo Platt, the government this week revealed that, despite being six months away from that target, 2,300 NHS computers are still running Windows XP.

  • 3 ways to benefit from open source infrastructure

    Using open source infrastructure can reduce operating costs and streamline upgrades, but it's important to weigh the pros and cons before you jump on the bandwagon.

  • System Boot and Security Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the System Boot and Security Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Computer-system security is a topic that has gotten a lot of serious attention over the years, but there has not been anywhere near as much attention paid to the system firmware. But the firmware is also a target for those looking to wreak havoc on our systems. Firmware is now being developed with security in mind, but provides incomplete solutions. This microconference will focus on the security of the system especially from the time the system is powered on.

  • This startup is giving away all its database software for free as open source, and it says it's not afraid of Oracle or Amazon

    Even though other companies have made defensive moves against Amazon to protect their business, the YugaByte co-founders explain why they're not worried about Amazon.

  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K04US
  • Samsung Chromebook 3

    Today we are looking at the Samsung Chromebook 3 (XE501C13-K01US). It is an affordable computer for all your basic everyday needs for a great price and good quality from Samsung. It comes with a fanless Dual-Core Intel Celeron Processor N3060 CPU, an 11.6 inch, 1366x768, LED display, and non-touch screen. It has 2GB of RAM and a 16GB eMMC SSD. It has Android Apps (Google Play) but it does not have Linux Apps (crostini) support and it will receive auto-updates until June 2021.

  • Acer Chromebook 11 7th Gen

    Today we are looking at the Acer Chromebook 11 7th Gen (CB3-132-C4VV / NX.G4XAA.002). It is a budget Chromebook, perfect for daily tasks like browsing the web, watching movies and writing documents. It comes with a fanless Dual-Core Intel Celeron Processor N3060 CPU, an 11.6 inch, 1366x768, IPS display, and non-touch screen. It has 4gb of RAM and a 16GB eMMC SSD.

  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C434

    Today we are looking at the ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DS384T. It is a 2 in 1 Chromebook, familiar laptop and tablet, and it comes with a sleek all-metal look and diamond-cut edges, makes it a perfect Chromebook for anyone who wants a stylish modern Chromebook!

  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K06US

    Today we are looking at the Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K06US. It is an affordable, yet powerful, small and thin computer for all your basic everyday needs for a great price and good quality from Samsung.

  • Samsung Chromebook Pro
  • Valve releases a new update to the Steam Client, nice Linux fixes made it in again

    Valve have released a new stable version of the Steam Client today to add new features, improve existing features and catch some pesky bugs flying around. There's some better "client logic" to choose and connect to download servers, which should hopefully give better download speeds, better connection login in initializing the friends list, screenshots in SteamVR Home should be sorted, a fix for certain web page elements continuing to render in the Steam client when it is minimized or closed to the system tray, some "improved reliability of registry saving on Linux and macOS" and the SteamVR dashboard should no longer obscure transition overlays when launching a game.

  • Fast-paced atmospheric arcade title "LOST ORBIT: Terminal Velocity" is out with Linux support

    You're going to need some quick reflexes for LOST ORBIT: Terminal Velocity, a game about being stranded in deep space. Note: Key provided by the developer. This is actually a revamp of the 2015 title LOST ORBIT. This new definitive edition includes a brand new 12 level epilogue and story, new abilities and ways to die, 15 new challenge levels, a reworking of the original levels with new cinematics and so on. If you owned the original, you should see this new edition in your Steam library free.