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Mozilla: Flexbox Inspector, WebRender and Another Person Quits

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Moz/FF
  • Designing the Flexbox Inspector

    The new Flexbox Inspector, created by Firefox DevTools, helps developers understand the sizing, positioning, and nesting of Flexbox elements. You can try it out now in Firefox DevEdition or join us for its official launch in Firefox 65 on January 29th.

    The UX challenges of this tool have been both frustrating and a lot of fun for our team. Built on the basic concepts of the CSS Grid Inspector, we sought to expand on the possibilities of what a design tool could be. I’m excited to share a behind-the-scenes look at the UX patterns and processes that drove our design forward.

  • WebRender newsletter #35

    Bonsoir! Another week, another newsletter. I stealthily published WebRender on crates.io this week. This doesn’t mean anything in terms of API stability and whatnot, but it makes it easier for people to use WebRender in their own rust projects. Many asked for it so there it is. Everyone is welcome to use it, find bugs, report them, submit fixes and improvements even!

    In other news we are initiating a notable workflow change: WebRender patches will land directly in Firefox’s mozilla-central repository and a bot will automatically mirror them on github. This change mostly affects the gfx team. What it means for us is that testing webrender changes becomes a lot easier as we don’t have to manually import every single work in progress commit to test it against Firefox’s CI anymore. Also Kats won’t have to spend a considerable amount of his time porting WebRender changes to mozilla-central anymore.

  • thank u, next

    I don’t believe that has any chance of changing; when I’ve tried to express my frustrations, I’ve only gotten disciplined. Mozilla is not interested in hearing what I have to say. And that’s fine, but when I take a step back and think about things, that means it’s time to go, for both my sake and Mozilla’s. So I’ve just put in my two weeks’ notice.

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Games on GNU/Linux: Latest News and Titles

  • Epic's Tim Sweeney thinks Wine "is the one hope for breaking the cycle", Easy Anti-Cheat continuing Linux support

    This is as a result of this article on Wccftech, which highlights a number of other interesting statements made by Sweeney recently. The funny this is, Valve themselves are helping to improve Wine (which Sweeney touches on below) with Steam Play (which is all open source remember) and a lot of the changes make it back into vanilla Wine.

  • Insurgency: Sandstorm for Linux not due until next year, with a beta likely first

    We're in for a sadly longer wait than expected for the first-person shooter Insurgency: Sandstorm [Steam], as it's not coming until next year for Linux. On a recent Twitch broadcast during the free weekend, it was asked in their chat "Linux will be released along with consoles or after?" to which the Lead Game Designer, Michael Tsarouhas said (here) "We haven't really announced our Linux or Mac release either, but we will just have to update you later, right now we can say we are focused on the PC post-release content and the console releases.".

  • Tense Reflection sounds like pretty original take on combining a shooter with a puzzle game

    Tense Reflection will ask you to think, solve and shoot as you need to solve puzzles to reload your ammo making it a rather unique hybrid of game genres. Developed by Kommie since sometime in 2016, the gameplay is split across three different panels you will need to switch between. A colour panel to pick the colour of your shots, the puzzle panel you need to solve to apply the colour and then the shooter to keep it all going.

  • The survival game 'SCUM' seems to still be coming to Linux, no date yet though

    SCUM, a survival game from Gamepires, Croteam and Devolver Digital that was previously confirmed to eventually come to Linux is still planned. They never gave a date for the Linux release and they still aren't, but the good news is that it still seems to be in their minds. Writing on Steam, a developer kept it short and sweet by saying "Its not to far" in reply to my comment about hoping the Linux version isn't far off. Not exactly much to go by, but it's fantastic to know it's coming as I love survival games like this.

  • In the real-time strategy game "Moduwar" you control and change an alien organism

    I absolutely love real-time strategy games, so Moduwar was quite a catch to find. It seems rather unique too, especially how you control everything. Instead of building a traditional base and units, you control an alien organism that can split and change depending on what you need to do. It sounds seriously brilliant! Even better, is that it will support Linux. I asked on the Steam forum after finding it using the Steam Discovery Queue, to which the developer replied with "Yes, there will be a Linux version, that's the plan. Thanks :)".

Review: Clear Linux and Guix System 1.0.1

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