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VLC Media Player Passes 3 Billion Downloads Mark, AirPlay Support Coming Soon

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The open-source VLC Media Player app from VideoLAN reached a major milestone today as it just passed the 3 billion downloads mark on the project's official website.
VLC is probably the most popular cross-platform media playback application available to date, used by millions of computer users worldwide on all major platforms, including GNU/Linux, Windows, macOS, Android, iOS, Chrome OS, and even Windows Phone OS.

It became one of the most popular media player apps mostly because of its ability to play any type of video without needing a codec pack. Most of the widely used video and audio codecs are incorporated into the application for a hassle-free video playback experience.

But you probably already knew that and already using VLC as your main video player app on your personal computer, tablet, or mobile phones. What you probably didn't know, is that VLC reached has been downloaded more than 3 billion times on the official website.

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Also: SparkleShare: Dropbox-Like Sync Client Powered By Git

VLC 3.0.6 Released

  • VLC 3.0.6 Released While The Project Celebrates Three Billion Downloads

    VLC 3.0.6 was released on Thursday while VideoLAN developers were at CES in Las Vegas celebrating the milestone of their cross-platform multimedia software surpassing three billion total downloads.

    Yesterday marked a triumphant milestone for this 17-year-old open-source media player project with having reached more than 3 billion downloads. Of course, that is just what they have been able to count with the potential being even higher due to VLC being packaged within some Linux distributions and other offline distribution scenarios. It's quite a milestone for the team to celebrate in Las Vegas during the Consumer Electronics Show.

VLC Just Passed 3 Billion Downloads

  • VLC Just Passed 3 Billion Downloads

    Open-source video player VLC today celebrates a gargantuan milestone — it’s 3 billionth download!

    The devs behind app say this is the total number of downloads they’ve been able to count via their website, with 25 percent of downloads coming from mobile platforms.

    Since most Linux users install VLC from a distributions’s archive, the true number of downloads for the app is likely much, much higher than 3 billion.

VLC About to Surpass 3 Billion Downloads

  • VLC to cross 3 billion downloads tomorrow, says AirPlay for Android coming soon

    VLC, the popular open source video and audio client, may be surpassing 3 billion downloads soon. VLC also looks to be supporting AirPlay on Android in a future update.

    According to Variety, lead develoepr Jean-Baptist Kempf says that VLC is expected to break 3 billion tomorrow, with roughly a one-fourth of those downloads coming from mobile devices.

    Meanwhile, Kempf says that VLC will support AirPlay in the future, which will allow Android devices to beam audio and videos to Apple TVs and other AirPlay-capable devices. VLC for iOS has been supporting AirPlay for quite some time now. Kempf says that AirPlay support on Android may make it to the main VLC in app “in about a month.”

  • VLC Expected to Break 3B Downloads at CES, Will Add Airplay Soon

    Open source video player app VLC was mere hours away from surpassing 3 billion downloads Friday, and the Videolan team celebrated the occasion with a special download counter at their CES booth in Las Vegas.

    VLC is expected to surpass the milestone some time Friday afternoon, according to Jean-Baptiste Kempf, one of the app’s lead developers. And in a sign of the times, around a quarter of those downloads are coming from mobile devices.

VLC passes 3 billion downloads, will get AirPlay support

  • VLC passes 3 billion downloads, will get AirPlay support and improved VR features soon

    In 1996, a group of students at Ecole Centrale Paris wondered if there was a way to efficiently stream videos across the campus. Their curiosity quickly turned into an academic project and paved the way to the early development of a media player application called VLC.

    Over the past 23 years, the VLC media player has become a household name, offering a helping hand to users who are struggling to play a video file that other applications won’t support. It is available on nearly every computing platform, a rarity in the apps ecosystem. Today, VLC reached another rare milestone: It has been downloaded more than 3 billion times across various platforms, up from 1 billion downloads in May 2012.

CBS

  • VLC readies Android to Apple TV streaming as media player hits 3 billion downloads

    VLC, developed by French non-profit VideoLAN, passed the milestone on Friday. VideoLAN president Jean-Baptiste Kempf told Variety that VLC will soon gain AirPlay support, allowing Android phones to stream video to Apple TV devices. It's also working on VR support for watching content with headsets like the HTC Vive.

    VideoLAN is aiming to add AirPlay support in the next major release, VLC 4, according to The Verge. This builds on last February's release of VLC 3, which enabled streaming to Chromecast devices and was the last release to support Windows XP. Prior to that, the media player hadn't received a major update for three years.

    VLC reached two billion total downloads in 2016, and, according to Kempf, today a quarter of downloads are coming from mobile devices.

    According to VideoLAN's statistics page, there are 164 million downloads of the VLC Android app, 78 million downloads of the Android beta VLC app, and 28 million downloads of the iOS VLC app.

VLC is adding AirPlay support and will reach 3 billion downloads

  • VLC is adding AirPlay support and will reach 3 billion downloads

    VLC, the open-source video player app, is announcing two major milestones from CES today. The development team, Videolan — along with Jean-Baptiste Kempf, one of the lead developers — told Variety at CES that it’ll be adding AirPlay support, allowing users to transmit videos from their iPhone (or Android) to their Apple TV.

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