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Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers, DebConf19 and More

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Debian
  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (November and December 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Abhijith PA (abhijith)
    Philippe Thierry (philou)
    Kai-Chung Yan (seamlik)
    Simon Qhuigley (tsimonq2)
    Daniele Tricoli (eriol)
    Molly de Blanc (mollydb)
    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Nicolas Mora
    Wolfgang Silbermayr
    Marcos Fouces
    kpcyrd
    Scott Martin Leggett

  • DebConf19 is looking for sponsors!

    DebConf19 will be held in Curitiba, Brazil from July 21th to 28th, 2019. It will be preceded by DebCamp, July 14th to 19th, and Open Day on the 20th.

    DebConf, Debian's annual developers conference, is an amazing event where Debian contributors from all around the world gather to present, discuss and work in teams around the Debian operating system. It is a great opportunity to get to know people responsible for the success of the project and to witness a respectful and functional distributed community in action.

    The DebConf team aims to organize the Debian Conference as a self-sustaining event, despite its size and complexity. The financial contributions and support by individuals, companies and organizations are pivotal to our success.

  • Nonce sense paper online

    When you create a cryptographic signatures using ECDSA (the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm), you need to come up with the nonce, a 256 bit random number. It is really important to use a different nonce every time, otherwise it is easy for someone else to take your signatures (which might be stored for everyone to read on the Bitcoin blockchain) and calculate your private key using relatively simple math, and with your private key they can spend all your Bitcoins. In fact, there is evidence that people out there continuously monitor the blockchains for signatures with such repeated nonces and immediately extract the money from compromised keys.

    Less well known, but still nothing new to the crypto (as in cryptopgraphy) community is the that an attacker can calculate the key from signature that use different, but similar nonces: For example if they are close by each other (only the low bits differ), or if they differ by exactly a large power of two (only the high bits differ). This uses a fancy and powerful technique based on lattices. Our main contribution here is to bridge crypto (as in cryptopgraphy) and crypto (as in cryptocurrency) and see if such vulnerabilities actually exist out there.

    And indeed, there are some. Not many (which is good), but they do exist, and clearly due to more than one source. Unfortunately, it is really hard to find out who made these signatures, and with which code, so we can only guess about the causes of these bugs. A large number of affected signatures are related to multisig transactions, so we believe that maybe hardware tokens could be the cause here.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Amiga floppy recovery project, part 3: preliminaries

    The first step for my Amiga project was to recover the hardware from my loft and check it all worked.

    When we originally bought the A500 (in, I think, 1991) we bought a RAM expansion at the same time. The base model had a whole 512KiB of RAM, but it was common for people to buy a RAM expander that doubled the amount of memory to a whopping 1 MiB. The official RAM expander was the Amiga 501, which fit into a slot on the underside of the Amiga, behind a trapdoor.

    The 501 also featured a real-time clock (RTC), which was powered by a backup NiCad battery soldered onto the circuit board. These batteries are notorious for leaking over a long enough time-frame, and our Amiga had been in a loft for at least 20 years. I had heard about this problem when I first dug the machine back out in 2015, and had a vague memory that I checked the board at the time and could find no sign of leakage, but reading around the subject more recently made me nervous, so I double-checked.

  • Debian Bug Squash Party Tokyo 2019-01
  • Mario Lang: Please delete me from Planet

    Wow. Hi Debian. Apparently, you've changed even more in a direction I personally never really liked. As a member of a minority group, I feel the need to explain that I highly dislike the way you are currently handling minority groups. And no, I dont feel you are ignoring them. You are giving a select view far too much attention for a technically focused project.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20 Allows Overclockers To Increase The Radeon TDP Power Limit

The AMDGPU Linux kernel driver for a while has now offered command-line-driven OverDrive overclocking for recent generations of Radeon GPUs. This has allowed manipulating the core and memory clock speeds as well as tweaking the voltage but has not supported increasing the TDP limit of the graphics card: that's in place with Linux 4.20 Up until now with the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver there hasn't been support for increasing the TDP power limit beyond its default, but has allowed for reducing that limit should you be trying to conserve power / allow your GPU to run cooler. A change was quietly added to the Linux 4.20 kernel to allow increasing the power limit when in the OverDrive mode. This change wasn't prominently advertised but fortunately a Phoronix reader happened to run across it today and tipped us off. Read more

Games: Zombie Panic! Source, Dicey Dungeon, NVIDIA RTX, Steam Play, Battle Motion, Ravva and the Cyclops Curse, Feudal Alloy

  • The Beta of Zombie Panic! Source was updated recently, should work better on Linux
    Zombie Panic! Source is currently going through an overhaul, as part of this it's coming to Linux with a version now in beta and the latest update should make it a better experience. [...] I personally haven't been able to make any of the events yet, so I have no real thoughts on the game. Once it's out of beta and all servers are updated, I will be taking a proper look as it looks fun. No idea when this version will leave beta, might be a while yet.
  • Dicey Dungeons, the new unique roguelike from Terry Cavanagh and co introduces quests
    We have a lot of roguelikes available on Linux (seriously, we do) yet Dicey Dungeons from Terry Cavanagh, Marlowe Dobbe, and Chipzel still remains fresh due to the rather unique game mechanics. I still can't get over how fun the dice mechanic is, as you slot dice into cards to perform actions. It's different, clever and works really well.
  • Quake 2 now has real-time path tracing with Vulkan
    If you have one of the more recent NVIDIA RTX graphics cards, here's an interesting project for you to try. Q2VKPT from developer Christoph Schied implements some really quite advanced techniques.
  • Steam Play versus Linux Version, a little performance comparison and more thoughts
    Now that Steam has the ability officially to override a Linux game and run it through Steam Play instead, let's take a quick look at some differences in performance. Before I begin, let's make something clear. I absolutely value the effort developers put into Linux games, I do think cross-platform development is incredibly important so we don't end up with more lock-in. However, let's be realistic for a moment. Technology moves on and it's not financially worth it to keep updating old games, they just don't sell as well as newer games (with exceptions of course). As the years go on, there will be more ways to run older games better and better, of that I've no doubt.
  • Battle Motion, a really silly massive fantasy battle game will have Linux support
    Sometimes when looking around for new games I come across something that really catches my eye, Battle Motion is one such game as it looks completely silly.
  • Ravva and the Cyclops Curse looks like a rather nice NES-inspired platformer
    Another lovely looking retro-inspired platformer! Ravva and the Cyclops Curse from developer Galope just released this week with Linux support.
  • Become a fish inside a robot in Feudal Alloy, out now with Linux support
    We've seen plenty of robots and we've seen a fair amount of fish, but have you seen a fish controlling a robot with a sword? Say hello to Feudal Alloy.

Addressing Icons Themes (Again)

I wrote some time ago on how platforms have a responsibility to respect the identity of applications, but now there’s some rumblings that Ubuntu’s community-built Yaru icon set (which is a derivative of the Suru icon set I maintain) intends to ignore this and infringe upon applications’ brands by modifying their icons... [...] For instance, the entire point of the GNOME icon refresh initiative is to address visual mismatches between third-party app icons and GNOME icons and we been have reaching out to developers to see about updating their icons to new design—this is the appropriate approach for a platform visual overhaul, by the way—which could always use more help on. Now I don’t see this ever happening, but I have hopes that someday Ubuntu will fully embrace GNOME and promote it as its desktop solution—especially given the desktop is out of the scope of the Ubuntu business these days. Read more

Wine 4.0 RC7

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc7 is now available.The Wine development release 4.0-rc7 is now available.
  • Juicy like the good stuff, Wine 4.0 RC7 is out with a delightful aroma
    No need to worry about a sour aftertaste here, we're of course talking about the wonderful software and not the tasty liquid. As usual, they're in bug-fix mode while they attempt to make the best version of Wine they can and so no super huge features made it in.
  • Wine 4.0-RC7 Released With Fixes For Video Player Crashes, Game Performance Issues
    Wine 4.0 should be officially out soon, but this weekend the latest test release of it is Release Candidate 7 that brings more than one dozen fixes. Wine 4.0 remains in a feature freeze until its release, which will likely be within the next two weeks or so. Since last Friday's Wine 4.0-RC6, the RC7 release has 13 known bug fixes. Catching our interest are some game performance regressions being resolved, including for Hot Pursuit, Project CARS, Gas Guzzlers, and others. There are also video player crash fixes when opening audio or video files.