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1080p/1440p Linux Gaming Performance For Radeon RX 590/Vega & NVIDIA 1060/1070/1080/2060/2070

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Complementing the benchmarks done earlier this week in the our NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Linux review, here are more benchmarks of the GeForce RTX 2060 $349 USD graphics card that is beginning to ship next week. This article offers up a plethora of 1920 x 1080 and 2560 x 1440 Linux gaming benchmarks while providing the very latest driver performance results on the AMD Radeon RX 590, RX Vega 56, and RX Vega 64 while on the NVIDIA side was the GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 and RTX 2060/2070 graphics cards.

The RTX 2060 Linux review featured a number of 1440p/4K results while this article is focused on the 1080p and 1440p Linux gaming performance with the range of eight graphics cards tested. On the NVIDIA driver side was the 395.25 driver atop the Linux 4.20 kernel. On the Radeon side was the latest Mesa 19.0-devel state built against LLVM 8.0 SVN via the Padoka PPA as of this week, offering a look at the near-final Mesa 19.0 RADV/RadeonSI performance with the 19.0 code entering its feature freeze next week.

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Announcing Qt for MCUs

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Useful security software from the Snap Store

Once upon a time, password management was a simple thing. There were few services around, the Internet was a fairly benign place, and we often used the same combo of username and password for many of them. But as the Internet grew and the threat landscape evolved, the habits changed. In the modern Web landscape, there are thousands of online services, and many sites also require logins to allow you to use their full functionality. With data breaches a common phenomenon nowadays, tech-savvy users have adopted a healthier practice of avoiding credentials re-use. However, this also creates a massive administrative burden, as people now need to memorize hundreds of usernames and their associated passwords. The solution to this fairly insurmountable challenge is the use of secure, encrypted digital password wallets, which allow you to keep track of your endless list of sites, services and their relevant credentials. KeePassXC does exactly that. The program comes with a simple, fairly intuitive interface. On first run, you will be able to select your encryption settings, including the ability to use KeePassXC in conjunction with a YubiKey. Once the application is configured, you can then start adding entries, including usernames, passwords, any notes, links to websites, and even attachments. The contents are stored in a database file, which you can easily port or copy, so you also gain an element of extra flexibility – as well as the option to back up your important data. Read more Also: US Hangs Tough on Restricting Huawei’s Participation in Standards Development