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Graphics: Canonical's Mir, Mesa 19.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mir Made Good Progress Over The Holidays With Porting To Debian & Alpine, ARM Mali

    Canonical's Mir display server is off to a good start for 2019 with a lot of work and pet projects being worked on over the holidays by the developers involved.

    Lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths shared some of the recent Mir accomplishments for this Wayland-supported display stack:

    - Progress in landing Mir within Debian, currently targeting Debian experimental.

    - Getting Mir available in Alpine Linux and as part of that allowing Mir to work with the Musl libc library as an alternative to Glibc.

  • Mesa 19.0 Picks Up Intel NIR Caching Patches To Help With Shader Re-Compiles

    With just days to go until the Mesa 19.0 branching and feature freeze, it's a busy time on Mesa Git with developers working to land their latest changes into this next quarterly feature release.

    Jason Ekstrand, the lead developer of Intel's "ANV" open-source Vulkan driver at their Open-Source Technology Center, landed a set of patches overnight around NIR caching.

    With adding NIR caching support to the driver's pipeline cache, the end result of this latest work is enabling caching of pre-lowered NIR. Caching at this lower-level, Ekstrand explained, should help with faster shader recompiles happening due to state changes.

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