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Weekly Debian Nubiles #6

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Linux
Humor

Did you ever get the feeling that maybe all of the adults have left the Debian project for greener pastures (ie Ubuntu)? When you read about developers deliberately sabotaging the release of Etch do you just think "Oh well, another candidate for the famous Linux Hissy-Fit Award" or do you possibly begin to wonder if this points to a deeper, darker, drearier and - notwithstanding my amazing powers of alliteration - way way dastardlier plot.

Yes, brave reader, welcome to this week's Weekly Debian Nubiles - the column that dares to ask the undarable questions, to climb the unclimbable heights, to view the unviewable porn... And the important question for this week is, are we dealing with a bunch of selfish thirteen year old primadonnas who apparently don't give a toss about Debian? And if so, how attractive is Opensuse looking right now?

Full Story.

Say what? Debian developers are 'childish'

Andreas Barth and fellow Debian version 4 release manager Steve Langasek probably predicted a little bit of resentment from fellow contributors to the Linux project when they set up an "experiment" help fund their efforts. After all, they called it Dunc-Tank, which naturally reminds us of a really fun carnival sport.

While the rest of the team is getting paid nothing, as is the norm in open-source communities, Barth and Langasek have reportedly raised enough to pay themselves $6,000 each.

They probably didn't predict, though, that Dunc-Tank, which they said was designed to help speed the release of the next version of Debian, dubbed Etch, would have the exact opposite effect.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Bad approach?

They should have arranged it such that all key devs and major contributors to Debian get paid to make the Dec 2006 deadline.

Now, its all gone to crap. I don't think "Etch" will make it until Jan 2007. (I've noticed some Debian contributors simply didn't update the components or drivers that they were responsible for, as an act of protest).

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