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Android Leftovers

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Proprietary Software and Openwashing

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Outreachy gets US$50000 IBM Open Source Community Grant

    Winners are picked through votes cast by IBM's internal open source community.

  • IBM awards second Open Source Community Grant to Outreachy

    IBM has named internship and mentor program Outreachy as the winner of its second $50,000 Open Source Community Grant. Outreachy is a nonprofit that provides internships in the free and open source software (FOSS) space for people from groups that face under-representation, systemic bias, or discrimination in the technology industry of their countries.

  • Michel Alexandre Salim: Linux in the Time of COVID-19

    Rather than consuming the latest upstream kernel within roughly a month of it coming out (when Fedora releases its build), why not use the CentOS kernel? It’s stable (only critical fixes are backported), and since CentOS 8 is relatively new it happens to be the newest kernel officially supported by Nvidia anyway. For Chef users, we open sourced cpe_kernel_channel, our cookbook for opting to use the CentOS kernel instead of the regular Fedora kernel. The next obvious step is to run CentOS itself rather than Fedora. Happily CentOS 8 runs well enough even on most recent ThinkPad laptops (let’s forget about that Yoga with a suspend issue). The one notable exception is Bluetooth audio support - bouncing bluetooth and pulseaudio repeatedly to get A2DP working is nobody’s idea of fun. We might need to ship backported Fedora components to address this (ironic, yes). If you see recent commits to our IT-CPE repo adding CentOS support, that’s why.

  • Mainframes, DevOps, and Ansible

    You probably know all this (and more), but what is Ansible? Ursula K Le Guin first used the word ‘ansible’ in her 1966 novel “Rocannon's World”. The word was a contraction of ‘answerable’, because the device would allow its users to receive answers to their messages in a reasonable amount of time, even over interstellar distances. Other authors have also used the word. But that’s not what we’re talking about today! Ansible is an open-source software provisioning, configuration management, and application-deployment tool that runs on Unix-like systems, and can configure both Unix-like systems as well as Microsoft Windows. It has its own declarative language to describe system configuration. Ansible was written by Michael DeHaan and was acquired by Red Hat in 2015. Ansible is agentless, temporarily connecting remotely via SSH or Windows Remote Management (allowing remote PowerShell execution) to do its tasks. The exciting news is that it’s now available on mainframes as IBM z/OS Ansible, and it enables users to automate z/OS applications and IT infrastructure. It will also enable users to automate development and operations through unified workflow orchestration across platforms. And that makes it a DevOps tool. It can work with existing JCL, REXX, and z/OSMF assets. Ansible uses modules, which are mostly standalone and can be written in scripting languages such as Python, Perl, Ruby, Bash, etc. If you read further, you’ll find the word ‘idempotency’ being used. This is from maths (and programming) and means that even if an operation is repeated multiple times (for example when recovering from an outage), it will always place the system into the same state. It also uses the idea of inventory configuration. Inventory is a description of the nodes that can be accessed by Ansible. By default, the Inventory is described by a configuration file, in INI or YAML format. The configuration file lists either the IP address or hostname of each node that is accessible by Ansible. In addition, nodes can be assigned to groups. Playbooks are YAML files that express configurations, deployment, and orchestration in Ansible. They allow Ansible to perform operations on managed nodes. Each Playbook maps a group of hosts to a set of roles. Each role is represented by calls to Ansible tasks.

Browsing Google's Open-Source Projects and More

  • Code Search Now Available to Browse Google's Open-Source Projects

    Code Search is used by Google developers to search through Google's huge internal codebase. Now, Google has made it accessible to everyone to explore and better understand Google's open source projects, including TensorFlow, Go, Angular, and many others. CodeSearch aims to make it easier for developers to move through a codebase, find functions and variables using a powerful search language, readily locate where those are used, and so on. Code Search provides a sophisticated UI that supports suggest-as-you-type help that includes information about the type of an object, the path of the file, and the repository to which it belongs. This kind of behaviour is supported through code-savvy textual searches that use a custom search language. For example, to search for a function foo in a Go file, you can use lang:go:function:foo.

  • Now you can search code like a Googler…as long as it’s Google code

    Google has given devs, and anyone else who’s interested, the ability to delve deep into its open source projects, by launching code search across the key codebases. The vendor unwrapped Code Search this week, saying it was one of its own most popular internal tools and adding that the public tool will have the same binaries, but different flags. As for what they do with it, the blogpost announcing the tool said Googlers “search for half-remembered functions and usages; jump through the codebase to figure out what calls the function they are viewing; and try to identify when and why a particular line of code changed.”

  • Noble.AI completes contributions to TensorFlow, Google’s open-source framework for deep learning

    Noble.AI, whose artificial intelligence (AI) software is purpose-built for engineers, scientists, and researchers and enables them to innovate and make discoveries faster, announced that it had completed contributions to TensorFlow, the world’s most popular open-source framework for deep learning created by Google. “Part of Noble’s mission is building AI that’s accessible to engineers, scientists and researchers, anytime and anywhere, without needing to learn or re-skill into computer science or AI theory,” said Dr. Matthew C. Levy, Founder and CEO of Noble.AI.

  • Google: We're opening Code Search for Go, Angular, Dart, Flutter, TensorFlow and more

    Google has launched Code Search for several of its popular open-source projects, giving the wider software community what until now has been one of Google's most popular internal tools for developers. Code Search or 'CS' for open-source Google projects for now supports Angular, Bazel, Dart, ExoPlayer, Firebase SDK, Flutter, Go, gVisor, Kythe, Nomulus, Outline, and Tensorflow – which represent a small portion of Google's open-source projects, but ones that open-source communities may benefit from search being available on their respective repositories.

Linux Foundation and HPE in Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative

  • HPE's open source program simplifies end-to-end automation and accelerates technology evolution

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative, a new open source program that will simplify the management of large-scale geographically distributed physical infrastructure deployments. In addition, HPE will introduce an enterprise offering, the HPE Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Resource Aggregator that is aligned with the initiative.

  • HPE unveils open source software to reduce 5G complexity

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) has unveiled the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management initiative, an open source programme designed to simplify the management and roll-out of large-scale geographically distributed physical 5G infrastructure deployments. HPE sees 5G as representing a huge shift in the way mobile networks are built and, unlike previous generation networks that were largely built on proprietary systems, using standards designed to use open software platforms operating on commercial off-the-shelf servers.

  • HPE turns up 5G heat with open source management project

    Just weeks after HPE made its biggest play yet for the 5G market with the launch of a hosted 5G core (see Wireless Watch March 16 2020), it has announced an open source project with Intel and the Linux Foundation, also focused on the core. While its previous announcement brought the as-a-service model, so familiar in the enterprise, to operators, this new cooperation imports another enterprise norm that is slowly taking hold in the telco world, the open source platform. Both these changes help to bring the economics of the IT and cloud markets to telecoms, and in doing so, provide an opportunity for new 5G entrants like HPE to try to unseat the incumbent vendors along with their proprietary…

  • HPE to launch open source software for 5G core

    HPE is partnering with Intel and the Linux Foundation as it continues its push to sell 5G core network equipment. HPE and Intel plan to build an open source project under the Linux Foundation to help operators automate network management as they roll out next-generation networks across sites that use hardware from multiple vendors. HPE calls its new partnership the Open Distributed Infrastructure Management Initiative. In addition to Intel, HPE is partnering with several other companies for this initiative, including IBM's open source software unit Red Hat and IT services giant Tech Mahindra, as well as AMI (an input/output system firmware vendor), Apstra (a data center network automation specialist) and World Wide Technology (a provider of automation and orchestration solutions for carriers and enterprises).

  • HPE allies with Intel to ease open source 5G rollouts

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) sought to speed adoption of open source 5G infrastructure, teaming with Intel on a new software initiative which aims to solve complexity issues associated with using multiple network vendors. In a statement, HPE said its Open Distributed Infrastructure Management (ODIM) initiative will provide “infrastructure manageability code” to the open source community, to enable vendor-neutral configuration and management of compute, storage and other infrastructure.

  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise Aims To Deliver 5G Simplification

    This week Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) announced a set of initiatives aimed at simplifying operator deployments of 5G, including a new platform initiative, enhanced standards and tools, and open source collaboration. I recently spent time with executives from the company’s telecommunications division. I would like to share my insights into what I found to be the most significant portions of the announcements.