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Devices: Raspberry Pi Birthday and Zotac's New Introduction

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Hardware
  • Celebrate our seventh birthday at a Raspberry Jam near you! - Raspberry Pi

    Seven years ago, the Raspberry Pi was launched, and that kickstarted everything the Foundation has done. We always celebrate this “birthday” with community-focused events, and this year on the first March weekend, we are again coordinating local Jams all over the world so you can join the party!

  • Zotac unveils ZBOX Pro line of mini PCs commercial and industrial applications

    Zotac has been making small form-factor PCs for years, with the company’s ZBOX line of mini PCs pre-dating Intel’s NUC line of tiny desktop computers. But for the most part Zotac has focused on the consumer or business space, with mini PCs that you could use as small, quiet desktop computers, gaming systems, video players, or digital signage systems.

    Now Zotac is launching a new line of mini computers aimed squarely at the industrial and consumer spaces. The Zotac ZBOX Pro line of embedded computers are designed to power things like medical equipment, industrial robots, casino game systems, IoT gateways, and ATMs.

Raspberry Pi gets its own brick-and-mortar retail store

  • Raspberry Pi gets its own brick-and-mortar retail store

    Raspberry Pi, for the uninitiated, is a credit card-sized contraption that can serve as the building block for a fully functional computer. Users can construct working PCs or machines that control their connected home, for example, and it is also used by some third-party maker companies as part of their DIY computer kits.

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation, which develops the device, has come a long way since it opened way back in 2012. The nonprofit organization now sells multiple versions of the device aimed at various use cases, along with related accessories, such as touchscreen displays.

Original post

  • Raspberry Pi Official Retail Store Opens in Cambridge

    At the store, we caught up with Gordon Hollingworth, Director of Software Engineering at Raspberry Pi, to ask why Raspberry Pi was opening a retail store. The idea is to “reach out” to customers interested in coding, making, and electronics, and introduce them to Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi opens its first bricks-and-mortar retail store

  • Raspberry Pi opens its first bricks-and-mortar retail store

    On sale at the store will be the entire Raspberry Pi range, and all the add-ons and extras you need to get going. There's even an 'Everything you need to get started with Raspberry Pi' kit, comprising the top-of-the-range Model 3B+ and a book offering full instructions on how to get going in the wibbly-wobbly world of home coding.

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