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Looking into the FSF's BadVista campaign

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Microsoft

BadVista is the latest in a series of activist campaigns launched by the Free Software Foundation (FSF)in the last eight months. It follows the highly successful Defective By Design campaign against so-called Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies, and an unnamed effort to encourage the activist media to make free software part of their agenda. Released on December 15, the campaign currently takes the form of a blog site coordinated by John Sullivan, a program administrator at the FSF. The site features a logo with its name over a quartered flag reminiscent of the Windows logo, but in black and with what appears to be a skull in one corner. So far, the contents is mostly the announcement of the site, an explanation of its purpose, and a news aggregate about the problems and limitations of Microsoft's Vista operating system.

However, according to Sullivan, these pieces of content are only the beginning. Nor, despite the name, is the campaign about Microsoft-bashing so much as protesting the DRM provisions of Vista and advocating free software as an alternative.

"The reason why we launched the site without the whole campaign already there," says Sullivan, "Is that we wanted the site to be a way to organize people and to get their ideas and voices involved. So we're going to be asking people to send us ideas and their reports on their [anti-Vista] activities."

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