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GNOME Desktop/GTK: Gnome Shell Extension for Chromecast, GTK Hackfest in Brussels, GTK+ Renamed to GTK and New in GNOME Photos

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GNOME
  • Stream Videos, Music And Pictures From Gnome To Chromecast With Cast To TV Extension (v6 And v7 Released)

    If you own a Chromecast device and you're using Gnome Shell, you should give Cast to TV a try. This Gnome Shell extension adds a new entry in the system menu which allows casting local files to Chromecast or other devices over the local network.

  • Report from the GTK hackfest in Brussels

    Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, various GTK developers were able to meet in Brussels right after FOSDEM, for one of our yearly hackfests.

  • GTK+ No More - It's Just GTK As Developers Prepare For This Year's GTK 4.0

    Beyond the FOSDEM conference itself this past week in Brussels, GNOME developers also used the occasion once again for hosting a developer "hackfest" as they prepare for the home stretch in GTK 4.0 development.

    First up, the developers did decide this week to do away with "GTK+" with the project formally just going by "GTK" now... The "plus" is no more. "The "plus" was added to "GTK" once it was moved out of the GIMP sources tree and the project gained utilities like GLib and the GTK type system, in order to distinguish it from the previous, in-tree version. Very few people are aware of this history, and it's kind of confusing from the perspective of both newcomers and even expert users; people join the wrong IRC channel, the URLs on wikis are fairly ugly, etc."

  • GTK+ renamed to GTK

    The GTK+ toolkit project has, after extensive deliberation, decided to remove the "+" from its name.

  • GNOME Photos: an overview of zooming

    One thing that I really wanted from the beginning was smooth zooming. When the user clicks one of the zoom buttons or presses a keyboard shortcut, the displayed image should smoothly flow in and out instead of jumping to the final zoom level — similar to the way the image smoothly shrinks in to make way for the palette when editing, and expands outwords once done. See this animated mock-up from Jimmac to get an idea.

    For the zooming to be smooth, we need to generate a number of intermediate zoom levels to fill out the frames in the animation. We have to dish out something in the ballpark of sixty different levels every second to be perceived as smooth because that’s the rate at which most displays refresh their screens. This would have been easier with the 5 to 20 megapixel images generated by smart-phones and consumer-grade digital SLRs; but just because we want things to be slick, it doesn’t mean we want to limit ourselves to the ordinary! There is high-end equipment out there producing images in excess of a hundred megapixels and we want to robustly handle those too.

    Downscaling by large factors is tricky. When we are aiming to generate sixty frames per second, there’s less than 16.67 milliseconds for each intermediate zoom level. All we need is a slightly big zoom factor that stresses the CPU and main memory just enough to exceed our budget and break the animation. It’s a lot more likely to happen than a pathological case that crashes the process or brings the system to a halt.

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Wine 4.0.2 Released

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 4.0.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.0.2 Released With 66 Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0.2 is out today as the second stable point release to this year's Wine 4.0 cycle. As is customary for Wine stable point releases, only bug fixes are allowed in while new features come by way of the bi-weekly development releases that will lead up to the Wine 5.0 release in early 2020.

  • The stable Wine 4.0.2 release is now available

    If you prefer to walk on the calmer side of life, the Wine 4.0.2 release has been made available today. As it's just a "maintenance" release, there's no big new features which are reserved for the current 4.xx series currently at 4.14 released on August 17th. With that in mind they noted 66 bugs being marked as solved. These bugs include issues with Worms 2, Warframe, Rogue Squadron 3D, Settlers III, Mass Effect, F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin, The Sims and plenty more.

  • Linux Gaming FINALLY Doesn't SUCK!

28 facts about Linux for its 28th birthday

Nearly three decades ago, Linus Torvalds sent the email announcing Linux, a free operating system that was "just a hobby" and not "big and professional like GNU." It's fair to say that Linux has had an enormous influence on technology and the world in general in the 28 years since Torvalds announced it. Most people already know the "origin story" of Linux, though. Here's 28 things about Linux (the kernel and larger ecosystem) you may not already know. 1 - Linux isn't very useful alone, so folks took to creating Linux distributions to bundle user software with it, make it usable and easier to install. The first Linux distribution was Softlanding Linux System (SLS), first released in 1992 and using the .96p4 Linux kernel. You could buy it on 5.25" or 3.5" floppies, or CD-ROM if you were high-tech. If you wanted a GUI, you needed at least 8MB of RAM. 2 - SLS didn't last, but it influenced Slackware Linux, which was first released in 1993 and is still under development today. Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and celebrated its 26th birthday on July 17th this year. 3 - Linux has the largest install base of any general purpose operating system. It powers everything from all 500 of the Top 500 Supercomputers to Android phones, Chomebooks, and all manner of embedded devices and things like the Kindle eBook readers and smart televisions. (Also the laptop used to write this post.) Read more

Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go! Read more