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Free/Open Source Software in Networking

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  • The role of open source in networking

    Technology is always evolving. However, in recent time, two significant changes have emerged in the world of networking. Firstly, the networking is moving to software that can run on commodity off-the-shelf hardware. Secondly, we are witnessing the introduction and use of many open source technologies, removing the barrier of entry for new product innovation and rapid market access.

    Networking is the last bastion within IT to adopt the open source. Consequently, this has badly hit the networking industry in terms of slow speed of innovation and high costs. Every other element of IT has seen radical technology and cost model changes over the past 10 years. However, IP networking has not changed much since the mid-’90s.

  • Ericsson becomes newest member of O-RAN Alliance

    The vendor said that it will “actively support and drive discussions and development of network architecture evolution”

    Ericsson has joined the O-RAN Alliance, which focuses on evolving the radio access network (RAN) architecture and orchestration toward open-source, rather than proprietary, implementations.

    Ericsson said that joining the O-RAN Alliance “reinforces [its]commitment to network evolution, openness, and industry collaboration” and that it will “focus on the open interworking between RAN and network orchestration and automation, with emphasis on AI-enabled closed-loop automation and end-to-end optimization, with the aim of lowering operating cost and improve end-user performance.”

  • AT&T Inks '8-Figure' Kubernetes & OpenStack 5G Deal With Mirantis

    AT&T needs Kubernetes and OpenStack to provide the flexibility and agility required for a cutting edge, continent-spanning 5G network. "There really isn't much of an alternative," Van Wyk says. "Your alternative is VMware. We've done the assessments, and VMware doesn't check boxes we need."

    He adds, "We're progressive, we're on the bleeding edge. The 5G core and architecture we're implementing -- we're doing it for the first time in the world. When you're pushing the capabilities of the available software and you're in the front end of that, you need to innovate fast. We believe the communities around open source projects are the way to do that."

  • Mirantis signs huge networking deal with AT&T

    This is an eight-figure, three-year deal to build out AT&T 5G's infrastructure using Airship. Airship is a project originally founded by AT&T, SKT, and Intel. It was launched as a pilot Open Infrastructure Project under the OpenStack Foundation in May 2018. Airship is designed to enable telcos to take advantage of on-premises Kubernetes infrastructure to support their SDN infrastructure builds.

    Mirantis will collaborate with AT&T and other core contributors to develop Airship's critical features. This work will then be rapidly deployed in production at scale via AT&T's Airship, Kubernetes, and OpenStack-based Network Cloud infrastructure.

  • Charter Might Paint Its Home Gateways & Devices 'Prpl'

    Charter Communications is giving serious consideration to Prpl, a new open source software stack for broadband gateways and other devices, as the MSO mulls its next-gen plans for gateways and other broadband devices that can support and run a mix of new value-added smart home and IoT services and applications, multiple industry sources said.

    Prpl, an open source software effort run by the Prpl Foundation , has some linkages to OpenWrt, a generic platform that's on millions of retail routers and has gained some traction with various telcos. As it's been retail-focused, OpenWrt itself doesn't have a service provider layer, but Prpl is adding those key elements, providing hooks into service provider backend systems. That effort emerges as carriers seek out open source software options that can provide consistency across different OEMs and establish a way for them to manage and orchestrate new services across their population of devices.

  • CPU Selection for uCPE Is About More Than Architecture

    I've often said that network functions virtualization (NFV) is about bringing cloud technologies to the telco network. One of the biggest benefits of such a transition is the replacement of closed appliances with open servers. The most common of these servers are built on Intel architecture (IA), but other architecture options are available, including ARM.

  • Coders and developers: The new heroes of the network?

    The news announcements came thick and fast, and at every turn, they were software-defined. From the extension of its intent-based networking (IBN) platform to the edge of the enterprise to support application innovation around the internet of things (IoT), to the introduction of HyperFlex for Branch, which supports “datacentre-class app performance” in branch offices and remote sites, software is on the march at Cisco, and is now well on its way to becoming firmly established at the core of Cisco’s customers’ networks.

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