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Programming: Webview and Lorca, Python, C++, Anaconda, PyPy, GTK/Rust

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  • Electron Apps Are Bad, So Now You Can Create Desktop Apps With HTML5 + Golang

    The Electron software framework that allows creating desktop GUI application interfaces using JavaScript and relies upon a bundled Chromium+Node.js run-time is notorious among most Linux desktop users for being resource heavy, not integrating well with most desktops, and generally being despised. For those that are fond of using web standards for creating desktop GUIs, now there is a way to create desktop application front-ends using HTML5 and Golang but with less baggage. 

    Developer Serge Zaitsev presented at FOSDEM 2019 last weekend in Brussels about his work on the Webview and Lorca libraries. These libraries allow building modern desktop applications within the Go programming language while writing the interfaces in HTML5.

  • Return the day in a week with python

    In this example, we are going to develop a method which will receive a number from the user input and returns which day in a week is that numbers refer to. For example, 1 is Sunday and 2 is Monday. If the number is too large or too small then the program will return an error message. Below is the solution to this question, if you have a better solution don’t forget to leave your answer on the below tweet.

  • The Zen of Python
  • Moving iterators in C++

    This will be a short post about a feature in STL that seems to be not as well-known as it should be.

    Imagine we want to create a small function that collects files in the subdirectories of the current directory. So, a list that would be returned by ls */*.

    Note that namespace fs = std::filesystem; is used in the examples.

  • Catching up with the Anaconda distribution

    It's time to catch up with the Anaconda crew and see what's new in the Anaconda distribution. This edition of Python was created to solve some of the stickier problems of deployment, especially in the data science space. Their usage gives them deep insight into how Python is being used in the enterprise space as well. Which turns out to be a very interesting part of the conversation.

  • Düsseldorf Sprint Report 2019

    We are happy to report a successful and well attended sprint that is wrapping up in Düsseldorf, Germany. In the last week we had eighteen people sprinting at the Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf on various topics.

  • MPSC Channel API for painless usage of threads with GTK in Rust

    A very common question that comes up on IRC or elsewhere by people trying to use the gtk-rs GTK bindings in Rust is how to modify UI state, or more specifically GTK widgets, from another thread.

    Due to GTK only allowing access to its UI state from the main thread and Rust actually enforcing this, unlike other languages, this is less trivial than one might expect. To make this as painless as possible, while also encouraging a more robust threading architecture based on message-passing instead of shared state, I’ve added some new API to the glib-rs bindings: An MPSC (multi-producer/single-consumer) channel very similar to (and based on) the one in the standard library but integrated with the GLib/GTK main loop.

More in Tux Machines

Variscite unveils two i.MX8 QuadMax modules

Variscite announced Linux-powered “VAR-SOM-MX8” and “SPEAR-MX8” modules with an up to an i.MX8 QuadMax SoC plus up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC. It also previewed a VAR-SOM-6UL COM. At Embedded World next week in Nuremberg, Germany, Variscite will showcase its Linux and Android driven i.MX8-family computer-on-modules, including new VAR-SOM-MX8 and SPEAR-MX8 modules that feature NXP’s highest-end i.MX8 SoC up to a QuadMax model (see farther below). We have already covered most of the other showcased products, including the 14nm fabricated, quad -A53 i.MX8M Mini based DART-MX8M-Mini. When we covered the DART-MX8M-Mini in September, Variscite didn’t have an image or product page, but both are now available here Read more

Android Leftovers

Programming: Developer Happiness, Rblpapi 0.3.8 and Python

  • Developer happiness: What you need to know
    A person needs the right tools for the job. There's nothing as frustrating as getting halfway through a car repair, for instance, only to discover you don't have the specialized tool you need to complete the job. The same concept applies to developers: you need the tools to do what you are best at, without disrupting your workflow with compliance and security needs, so you can produce code faster. Over half—51%, to be specific—of developers spend only one to four hours each day programming, according to ActiveState's recent Developer Survey 2018: Open Source Runtime Pains. In other words, the majority of developers spend less than half of their time coding. According to the survey, 50% of developers say security is one of their biggest concerns, but 67% of developers choose not to add a new language when coding because of the difficulties related to corporate policies.
  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Keeping CRAN happy
    A minimal maintenance release of Rblpapi, now at version 0.3.9, arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the ninth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It accomodates a request by CRAN / R Core to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made (besides updating a now-stale URL at Bloomberg in a few spots and other miniscule maintenance). However, a few other changes have been piling up at the GitHub repo so feel free to try that version too.
  • Episode #200: Escaping Excel Hell with Python and Pandas
  • Testing native ES modules using Mocha and esm.

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