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PyPy 7.0.0

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  • PyPy 7.0.0 released

    All the interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the triple
    release.

    Until we can work with downstream providers to distribute builds with PyPy,
    we
    have made packages for some common packages `available as wheels`_.

    The `GC hooks`_ , which can be used to gain more insights into its
    performance, has been improved and it is now possible to manually manage the
    GC by using a combination of ``gc.disable`` and ``gc.collect_step``. See the
    `GC blog post`_.

  • PyPy 7.0 Released - The Alternative Python Interpreter Now With Alpha 3.6 Support

    PyPy, the popular Python implementation alternative to the de facto CPython and often faster thanks to its JIT compiler, is up to version 7.0 as of this morning.

    PyPy 7.0 continues offering Python 2.7 support via its Python2 interpreter and there is still PyPy3.5 as the Python 3.5 support target. New to the game is an alpha of PyPy3.6 that provides Python 3.6 features but not yet considered a stable release.

Easier Python paths with pathlib

  • Easier Python paths with pathlib

    Working with files is one of the most common things developers do. After all, you often want to read from files (to read information saved by other users, sessions or programs) or write to files (to record data for other users, sessions or programs).

    Of course, files are located inside directories. Navigating through directories, finding files in those directories, and even extracting information about directories (and the files within them) might be common, but they're often frustrating to deal with. In Python, a number of different modules and objects provide such functionality, including os.path, os.stat and glob.

    This isn't necessarily bad; the fact is that Python developers have used this combination of modules, methods and files for quite some time. But if you ever felt like it was a bit clunky or old-fashioned, you're not alone.

Original about PyPy

  • PyPy v7.0.0: triple release of 2.7, 3.5 and 3.6-alpha

    All the interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the triple release.
    Until we can work with downstream providers to distribute builds with PyPy, we have made packages for some common packages available as wheels.

    The GC hooks , which can be used to gain more insights into its performance, has been improved and it is now possible to manually manage the GC by using a combination of gc.disable and gc.collect_step. See the GC blog post.

Now in IDG/press

  • PyPy 7 speeds up Python 2.7, Python 3.5, and Python 3.6 alik

    PyPy, the Python runtime that uses just-in-time compilation to achieve major performance improvements over the stock CPython distribution, is now available in version 7.0 releases supporting Python 2.7, Python 3.5, and Python 3.6.
    According to a post on the official PyPy Status Blog, all three versions use “much the same codebase, thus the triple release.” The Python 3.6 interpreter is “the first official release of PyPy to support Python 3.6 features, although it is still considered alpha quality.” Most of the improvements to PyPy over the last release involve memory management and interfacing with external C code built for Python.
    CPython provides programmatic hooks into its garbage collection subsystem. PyPy 7 goes a step further, running the garbage collector in incremental steps to prevent the garbage collection process from bringing programs to a halt for too long.

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