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Security: Windows, Microsoft, Kubernetes and GNU/Linux

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Security
  • Hackers Are Using Windows .EXE File To Infect MacOS
  • Protecting the Logical Security of a Network Environment

    Microsoft Has Made Home Users More Vulnerable by Removing Local Security Policy Editor

    For years, Microsoft Windows provided two key methods for implementing logical security: Local Security Policy Editor (Group Policy Editor in the server environment) and the Advanced Firewall. Unfortunately, Microsoft has now removed the Local Security Policy Editor from Windows 10 Home edition. Microsoft provides it only in the Professional edition, which is a huge security mistake.

  • Runc and CVE-2019-5736

    This morning a container escape vulnerability in runc was announced. We wanted to provide some guidance to Kubernetes users to ensure everyone is safe and secure.

  • Reasonably secure Linux

    Put a lock on your door and they get in through a window. Lock the window and they’ll just smash it. Put bars on the windows and they pick your door lock. Deadbolt the door and they will trick their way in pretending to be the gas man. An analogy, how quaint!
    Computer security can, at times, feel like an arms race between global superpowers. Yet at least with the Linux kernel and open source everything’s out in the open. Indeed, there’s an entire world of developers whose livelihoods depend on the FOSS ecosystem being secured.

  • Meaningful 2fa on modern linux

    So there are a few parts here. AD is for intents and purposes an LDAP server. The
    is also an LDAP server, that syncs to AD. We don’t care if that’s 389-ds, freeipa or vendor solution. The results are basically the same.

    Now the linux auth stack is, and will always use pam for the authentication, and nsswitch for user id lookups. Today, we assume that most people run sssd, but pam modules for different options are possible.

    There are a stack of possible options, and they all have various flaws.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts: Going Linux and Full Circle Magazine

i.MX8M Mini based handheld dev kit has dual Linux BSPs

Solectrix is prepping an “SX Mobile Device Kit” for developing handhelds with Debian and Yocto Linux BSPs, an i.MX8M Mini SoC, an optional 5-inch touchscreen, WiFi, BT, GNSS, and mini-PCIe, and features for prototyping CSI-2 camera sensors. These days we rarely cover mobile computers, most of which are rugged field-service handhelds that run Android, such as Two Technologies’ N5Print. Yet, Solectrix’s SX Mobile Device Kit (MDK) seemed of particular interest since it’s a development kit with Linux BSPs and NXP’s new i.MX8M Mini SoC. In addition, a Solectrix GmbH rep informed us that optional features like GbE and USB Type-A host and GbE ports enable the MDK to be used as a general-purpose embedded development board. Purchase options range from buying the 125 x 78mm PCB by itself all the way up to a fully equipped handheld with a 5-inch screen. Yocto Project and Debian Linux BSPs are available, and the board also supports Android 9 Pie. Read more Also: i.MX8M and Snapdragon 820E SBCs run Linux and Android

today's howtos

Software Code’s “Wayback Machine” Gets a Boost

Call it the Wayback Machine of code: a searchable open archive of software source code across iterations; from buggy beta versions, to sophisticated contemporary release. Software Heritage is a non-profit initiative developed and hosted by the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation. Officially created in 2015, the project has been growing over the years. It now spans 5.6 billion source files from more than 88 million projects. Software Heritage is itself built on open-source code. It gathers source files by trawling through repositories that developers uses to create and share code, such as Github, Gitlab, GoogleCode, Debian, GNU and the Python Package Index, with users able to trace detailed revision history of all the codebase versions that it stores. Read more