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Odroid-N2 SBC has hexa-core Amlogic S922X and $63 to $79 price

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Android
Ubuntu

Hardkernel announced an “Odroid-N2” SBC with a Cortex-A73 and -A53 based Amlogic S922X SoC plus 2-4GB DDR4, 4x USB 3.0, HDMI 2.1, an audio DAC, and a 40-pin header.

Hardkernel unveiled its open-spec, Ubuntu-ready Odroid-N1 SBC a year ago with a Rockchip RK3399 SoC. Since it was scheduled for June shipment, we included it our reader survey of 116 hacker boards. Yet, just before we published the results, including a #16 ranking for the N1, Hardkernel announced it was shelving the board due to sourcing problems and switching to a similar new board with an unnamed new SoC. The Odroid-N2 would also switch to DDR4 RAM from the previously announced DDR3, which was in short supply.

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Another source

  • New Raspberry Pi challenger promises 7x the speed at 2x the price, with Android 9 Pie, USB 3.0, 4K video

    The long-awaited replacement to last year's cancelled Odroid-N1 is built around a system-on-a-chip (SoC) designed for high-end Android TV appliances, the Amlogic S922X.

    The ace up the $63 board's sleeve is its performance, courtesy of four 1.8GHz Arm Cortex A73-based processors and two 1.9GHz Arm Cortex A53-based processors, with the SoC able to switch tasks between processors to save energy.

    These newer Arm Cortex A73 processors promise better sustained performance, as they are able to run at their 1.8GHz top speed for longer periods without being throttled to reduce temperatures when under heavy load, thanks to being manufactured using a 12nm process technology.

    In tests, the board's makers Hardkernel show the CPU running about 7x faster than a Raspberry Pi 3 across several benchmarks, although they don't specify whether it's a Model B or the slightly faster Model B+. It should also outperform recently announced boards based on the Rockchip RK3399 chipset, such as the Rock Pi 4.

Microsoft Sneaking in

  • Take your pick: Linux on Windows 10 hardware, or Windows 10 on Linux hardware

    Some hardy souls managed to get the thing functioning in 2018, but with some pretty severe limitations. Iffy or non-existent drivers meant that services like Wi-Fi or Ethernet were sadly absent, making the thing more a curiosity than anything else.

    A very slow curiosity at that.

    Things changed this week, with the advent of some updated drivers and a hugely streamlined installation process. On the driver front, the issues I encountered (notably wobbly USB support) appear to have been resolved with properly ported drivers meaning the Ethernet port should now work along with external drives and a wider range of input devices. The onboard Wi-Fi, alas, remains borked.

    The code can be picked up from GitHub and is from the same team that emitted an installer to boot the Windows 10 desktop on Microsoft's abandoned Lumia 950 phones.

Won't Run, Barely Even Install...

Microsoft boosters: "Forget Linux"

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