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Server: UNIX, Server Virtualization, Red Hat and Fedora, Networking and PostgreSQL

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  • The long, slow death of commercial Unix [Ed: Microsoft propagandist Andy Patrizio should also do an article about the death of Windows Server.]

    In the 1990s and well into the 2000s, if you had mission-critical applications that required zero downtime, resiliency, failover and high performance, but didn’t want a mainframe, Unix was your go-to solution.

    If your database, ERP, HR, payroll, accounting, and other line-of-business apps weren’t run on a mainframe, chances are they ran on Unix systems from four dominant vendors: Sun Microsystems, HP, IBM and SGI. Each had its own flavor of Unix and its own custom RISC processor. Servers running an x86 chip were at best used for file and print or maybe low-end departmental servers.

  • What is Server Virtualization: Is It Right For Your Business?

    In the modern world of IT application deployment, server virtualization is a commonly used term. But what exactly is server virtualization and is it right for your business?

    Server virtualization in 2019 is a more complicated and involved topic than it was when the concept first started to become a popular approach nearly two decades ago. However, the core basic concepts and promises remain the same.

  • Transitioning Red Hat SSO to a highly-available hybrid cloud deployment

    About two years ago, Red Hat IT finished migrating our customer-facing authentication system to Red Hat Single Sign-On (Red Hat SSO). As a result, we were quite pleased with the performance and flexibility of the new platform. Due to some architectural decisions that were made in order to optimize for uptime using the technologies at our disposal, we were unable to take full advantage of Red Hat SSO’s robust feature set until now. This article describes how we’re now addressing database and session replication between global sites.

  • Red Hat named to Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list

    People come to work at Red Hat for our brand, but they stay for the people and the culture. It's integral to our success as an organization. It's what makes the experience of being a Red Hatter and working with other Red Hatters different. And it's what makes us so passionate about our customers’ and Red Hat’s success. In recognition of that, Red Hat has been ranked No. 50 on Fortune Magazine's list of 100 Best Companies to Work For! Hats off--red fedoras, of course--to all Red Hatters!

  • News from Fedora Infrastructure

    One of the first tasks we have achieved is to move as many application we maintain to use CentOS CI for our Continuous Integration pipeline. CentOS CI provides us with a Jenkins instance that is running in an OpenShift cluster, you can have a look at the this instance here.

    Since a good majority of our application are developed in Python, we agreed on using tox to execute our CI tests. Adopting tox on our application allows us to use a really convenient way to configure the CI pipeline in Jenkins. In fact we only needed to create .cico.pipeline file in the application repository with the following.

  • Mirantis to Help Build AT&T's Edge Computing Network for 5G On Open Source

    The two companies hope other telcos will follow AT&T's lead in building their 5G networks on open source software.

  • The Telecom Industry Has Moved to Open Source

    The telecom industry is at the heart of the fourth industrial revolution. Whether it’s connected IoT devices or mobile entertainment, the modern economy runs on the Internet.
    However, the backbone of networking has been running on legacy technologies. Some telecom companies are centuries old, and they have a massive infrastructure that needs to be modernized.
    The great news is that this industry is already at the forefront of emerging technologies. Companies such as AT&T, Verizon, China Mobile, DTK, and others have embraced open source technologies to move faster into the future. And LF Networking is at the heart of this transformation.
    “2018 has been a fantastic year,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager of Networking at Linux Foundation, speaking at Open Source Summit in Vancouver last fall. “We have seen a 140-year-old telecom industry move from proprietary and legacy technologies to open source technologies with LF Networking.”

  • Monroe Electronics Releases Completely Redesigned HALO Version 2.0

    With improvements including a new web-based interface and its shift to a unified web-server platform, HALO V2.0 simplifies and streamlines all of these critical processes. The new web-based interface for HALO V2.0 allows users to work with their preferred web browser (e.g., Chrome, Firefox, Safari). The central HALO server now runs on a Linux OS (Ubuntu and CentOS 7) using a PostgreSQL database.

  • PostgreSQL 11.2, 10.7, 9.6.12, 9.5.16, and 9.4.21 released

    The PostgreSQL project has put out updated releases for all supported versions. "This release changes the behavior in how PostgreSQL interfaces with 'fsync()' and includes fixes for partitioning and over 70 other bugs that were reported over the past three months."

More in Tux Machines

DebConf19 invites you to Debian Open Day at the Federal University of Technology - Paraná (UTFPR), in Curitiba

DebConf, the annual conference for Debian contributors and users interested in improving the Debian operating system, will be held in Federal University of Technology - Paraná (UTFPR) in Curitiba, Brazil, from July 21 to 28, 2019. The conference is preceded by DebCamp from July 14 to 19, and the DebConf19 Open Day on July 20. The Open Day, Saturday, 20 July, is targeted at the general public. Events of interest to a wider audience will be offered, ranging from topics specific to Debian to the greater Free Software community and maker movement. The event is a perfect opportunity for interested users to meet the Debian community, for Debian to broaden its community, and for the DebConf sponsors to increase their visibility. Less purely technical than the main conference schedule, the events on Open Day will cover a large range of topics from social and cultural issues to workshops and introductions to Debian. Read more

Sparky Linux 5.8

Today we are looking at Sparky Linux 5.8. This point release of Sparky 5 comes with LXQt 0.14.1, Debian Buster, Linux Kernel 4.19 and uses about 350MB of ram when idling. Sparky Linux LXQt has become one of my favorites, as it has a modern feeling, with the latest of Qt and the stability of Debian, makes it one great combination. Enjoy! Read more Direct/video: Sparky Linux 5.8 Run Through Under an hour ago:

  • What?s next Sparky?

    As before, after releasing a new stable version of Sparky, there are a few changes to do. So… Sparky 4 “Tyche” is moved to oldstable line now. The latest 4.11 release is the last one of the 4 line, but it is still supported, the next 2 years about. Sparky 5 “Nibiru” just released, moving it from testing to stable line. The stable live/install media are available for i686, amd64 & armhf archs (the same as the older release).

Android Leftovers

Fedora and IBM/Red Hat: Network Security Toolkit (NST), Fedora CoreOS and Openwashing at OSCON

  • Network Security Toolkit (NST) 30 SVN 11210, which is Based on Fedora 30

    Network Security Toolkit (NST) is a Linux-based live operating system that provides a set of free and open-source computer security and networking tools to perform routine security and networking diagnostic and monitoring tasks. It is based on Fedora and NST has included comprehensive set of Open Source Network Security Tools, which is published in sectools.org website. It is offering an advanced Web User Interface (GUI) for system/network administrator, which allows them to configure many network and security applications. NST Team is pleased to announce the latest NST release of “NST 30 SVN:11210” on 1th July 2019.

  • Fedora announces the first preview release of Fedora CoreOS as an automatically updating Linux OS for containerized workloads

    Three days ago, Fedora announced the first preview release of the open-source project Fedora CoreOS as a secure and reliable host for computer clusters. It is specifically designed for running containerized workloads with automatic updates to the latest OS improvements, bug fixes, and security updates. It is secure, minimal, monolithic and is optimized for working with Kubernetes. The main goal of Fedora CoreOS is to be a reliable container host to run containerized workloads securely and at scale. It integrates Ignition from Container Linux technology and rpm-ostree and SELinux hardening from Project Atomic Host. Fedora CoreOS is expected to be a successor to Container Linux eventually. The Container Linux project will continue to be supported throughout 2019, leaving users with ample time to migrate and provide feedback. Fedora has also assured Container Linux users that continued support will be provided to them without any disruption. Fedora CoreOS will also become the successor to Fedora Atomic Host. The current plan is for Fedora Atomic Host to have at least a 29 version and 6 months of lifecycle.

  • IBM helps developers use open source and machine learning

    As artificial intelligence and machine learning become more widespread, it's essential that developers have access to the latest models and data sets. Today at the OSCON 2019 open source developer conference, IBM is announcing the launch of two new projects for developers.