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Tweaking KDE 3.5.5

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KDE

For those of you who have not followed the comment thread on the 'On Favouritism, Apologies, and Black Helicopters' story: I there promised to write an article about all the customisations I do on KDE to make it look and (more importantly) behave in my own preferred way; as a sort of Christmas present, so to speak (it is not like it is a fast news day today). Read on!

The first thing you always have to go through when setting up a new Linux system is choosing which distribution you want to run. There are about 3256356958 different criteria on which this choice is based, but for me there is only one that counts: package management. Since I prefer apt/.deb over rpm (for the sole reason that I know all the cli commands for apt from the top of my head), Kubuntu is my distribution of choice. It comes with the latest KDE (3.5.5) and it comes with all the various desktop applications pre-installed. It requires no introduction, I suppose.

After the installation routine, the first thing I do is run an apt-get update, after which I delve into the process of installing the various non-free codecs and applications; this is a desktop system after all, and I need it to do stuff Stallman would not approve of, like watching DVDs and listening to .mp3s. This process would have been fairly painless were it not for the fact that Automatix relies on 100MB of GNOME dependencies, which I refuse to install on a KDE system. Hence, installing the non-free stuff has to be done manually.

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