Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

What's New in Symphony OS 2006-12

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The Symphony OS project released a new version of their unique system on December 13 to the surprise and delight of many in the Linux community. Many feared the revolutionary new desktop might be doomed due to a lack of funding, but developers chugged along through hard times and presented us with the culmination of months and months of work. Their labors show through in this release. As we're fans, Tuxmachines took Symphony OS 2006-12 for a bit of a test drive. So what's new this time?

For those new to Symphony OS, their site describes Symphony OS as follows:

SymphonyOS is a whole new type of Operating System, based on an advanced GNU/Linux base system Symphony provides Linux's renowned stability and immunity to Windows viruses along with what we consider to be the easiest to use interface out there, our Mezzo Desktop Environment. Installing applications is also a snap with our OneClick software store (we call it a store.. but everything there is free). You can see the latest news weather and other important information at a glance on your desktop with our desklet system and breathe new life into old hardware as all of this is designed to work on much lower end hardware than KDE or Gnome.


        

However, that's a bit outdated as One Click has now been replaced by Synaptic and is listed on the Programs page under Tasks as "Install Software." Synaptics is a wonderful program for installing software, usually. I didn't have a lot of luck with it under Symphony today. Errors varied, but I wasn't able to complete an install of anything. Perhaps it had to do with running off the livecd.

The Settings menu brings a lot of new abilities to Symphony OS this release. Previously, we only had Desktop Manager and Configure Login Screen listed, but this release we have several more. Other than those mentioned, also listed are:

  • Network Connection
  • Manage Users
  • Manage Disk Drives
  • Manage Services
  • Time & Date
  • Manage Share Folders

During my limited testing, these modules performed well and completed their intended function, except Manage Sharing Folders. This applet gave the error of needing Samba or NFS installed. Some of these apps were fairly complete while others were a bit minimalistic, but all add to the user experience and show the system is beginning to grow toward a viable desktop option.

VLC has been renamed to "Media Player" in its menu this go 'round, but unlike last time, it didn't function very well. In fact, it wouldn't open. Trying from the commandline found errors about modules and skins missing.


        

All in all we were quite pleased with the progress despite a few glitches here and there. This is still considered alpha code, so bugs are not only tolerated but expected. I love the new wallpaper and was glad to see all the new functions in the menu. Firefox has been updated to 2.0 and Synaptic is a wonderful choice in software managers. I didn't fully test the harddrive installer, but few posts seen on their site mention problems with dual boot setups and sata drives. If you've never booted Symphony OS, then you really should see it for yourself. It's definitely different from all the others. If you're a fan and haven't tested it as of yet, then again, you should probably see the new features. As always, we anxiously look forward to their next release.

Related Links:



It uses UnionFS

This CD's built on Slax's framework, and uses UnionFS to overlay the read-only filesystem in memory (like Knoppix does since v3.8, and other live CDs). (The UnionFS overlay can also be done from a loopback image saved on a hard drive or USB key.) So the filesystem acts as if it's completely read-write.

The problem with Synaptic seems to be related to a buggy package management system. The same error occurs using apt-get from the command line.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • GUADEC 2018 Reminiscences
    This year’s GUADEC in Almería, Spain, was over two months ago, and so here is a long overdue post about it. It was so long ago that I might as well call it a reminiscence! This will be a different kind of post than the ones I’ve done in past years, as plenty of other bloggers have already posted summaries about the talks.
  • Rugged, Linux-ready transportation PC has four SIM slots
    Nexcom’s Apollo Lake based “VTC 6220-BK” in-vehicle PC features triple displays, 2x SATA bays, 3x GbE with optional PoE, Ublox GPS, and 4x mini-PCIe or M.2 slots paired with SIM slots. Intel-based in-vehicle computers have been around for a while — here’s a Linux-friendly Kontron model from 2004 -– but over the last year or two the market has picked up considerably. Like many in-vehicle systems, Nexcom’s VTC 6220-BK is not an automotive IVI computer, but like Lanner’s Apollo Lake based V3G and V3S systems, is designed for buses. The rugged VTC 6220-BK straddles the IVI and telematics worlds, offering triple display support for passenger entertainment plus CAN and OBD connections.
  • FreeBSD Desktop – Part 16 – Configuration – Pause Any Application
    After using UNIX for so many years I knew that I could freeze (or pause) any process in the system with kill -17 (SIGSTOP) signal and then unfreeze it with with kill -19 (SIGCONT) signal as I described in the Process Management section of the Ghost in the Shell – Part 2 article. Doing it that way for the desktop applications is PITA to say the least. Can you imagine opening xterm(1) terminal and searching for all Chromium or Firefox processes and then freezing them one by one every time you need it? Me neither. Fortunately with introduction of so called X11 helper utilities – like xdotool(1) – it is now possible to implement it in more usable manner.
  • Custom Sustes Malware Infects Linux and IoT Servers Worldwide [Ed: This only impacts poorly-secured and already-cracked servers. The article overstates the risk.]
    The dangerous characteristic is the fact that an estimate of the infected computers cannot be made at this time. The only way to prevent the infiltrations is to strengthen the network security of the Linux and IoT servers exposed in public. It is very possible that further attacks will be carried out with other distribution tactics.
  • C Programming | Introduction | Features – For Beginners
    C is a general-purpose programming language developed by the ultimate god of the programming world, “Mr.Dennis Ritchie” (Creator of C programming ). The language is mainly used to create a wide range of applications for operating systems like windows and iOS. The popularity of the language can be clearly seen as this language has made to the list of top 10 programming languages in the world.

'We expect this is the bottom' in enterprise growth: Red Hat CEO

OSS Leftovers

  • AxonIQ Launches New Open Source Server
    AxonIQ, the company behind the open source Axon Framework, launches Axon 4.0 the open, integrated development and operations tool for Microservices and Event Sourcing on the JVM.
  • L10N Report: September Edition
  • Tidelift surpasses $1M to pay open source software maintainers
    Tidelift announced that it has surpassed one million dollars committed via its platform to pay open source software maintainers to provide professional assurances for their projects, as momentum behind this new approach to professional open source continues to build. Over 100 packages are already on the Tidelift platform, with maintainers getting paid to provide support for their packages through the Tidelift Subscription. Top packages featured include Vue, Material-UI, Babel, Gulp, Fabric, Active Admin, Doctrine, and StandardJS. With Tidelift, software development teams receive assurances around maintenance, security, and licensing from a single source. By bringing together maintainers with a global market of customers, Tidelift is helping make open source work better for everyone.
  • Artifex and First National Title Insurance Company Reach Settlement Over MuPDF Open Source Dispute
    Artifex Software, Inc. and First National Title Insurance Company announced today a confidential agreement to settle their legal dispute. Case No. 4: 18-cv-00503-SBA, filed by Artifex in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California, concerned the use of Artifex's open source software MuPDF under the GNU Affero General Public License and the GNU General Public License. While the parties had their differences in the interpretation of the open source licenses, the companies were able to reach an amicable resolution based on their mutual respect for and recognition of copyright protection and the open source philosophy. Terms of the settlement remain confidential.

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]