Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux 5.0

Filed under
Linux

Ok, so the last week of the 5.0 release wasn't entirely quiet, but
it's a lot smaller than rc8 was, and on the whole I'm happy that I
delayed a week and did an rc8.

It turns out that the actual patch that I talked about in the rc8
release wasn't the worrisome bug I had thought: yes, we had an
uninitialized variable, but the reason we hadn't immediately noticed
it due to a warning was that the way gcc works, the compiler had
basically initialized it for us to the right value. So the same thing
that caused not the lack of warning, also effectively meant that the
fix was a no-op in practice.

But hey, we had other bug fixes come in that actually did matter, and
the uninitialized variable _could_ have been a problem with another
compiler.

Regardless - all is well that ends well. We have more than a handful
of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go "Hmm,
things are really unstable". In fact, at least two thirds of the
patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it's not
like 5.0 itself looks bad.

Knock wood.

Anyway, with this, the merge window for 5.1 is obviously open, and I'm
happy to see that I already have several early pull requests. Which
I'll start processing tomorrow.

And appended is - as usual - the shortlog just for the last week. The
overall changes for all of the 5.0 release are much bigger. But I'd
like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases,
and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers
started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.

Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.0 Kernel Released With Long-Awaited FreeSync Support, Many New/Improved Features

Linux Kernel 5.0 Officially Released, Here's What's New

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The development cycle of the Linux 5.0 kernel series kicked off two months ago, during which seven RC (Release Candidate) milestones were published for testing paving the road for this major version change, which, sadly, doesn't mean anything besides the fact that running Linux 5.x is cooler than running Linux 4.x.

    "The overall changes for all of the 5.0 release are much bigger. But I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes," said Linus Torvalds in a mailing list announcement.

"But It Doesn’t Mean Anything"

Linux Kernel 5.0 Released!

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released! Check Out The New Features

    Linus Torvalds has announced the release of Linux Kernel 5.0.

    Don’t get too excited thinking it’s a major new release because it’s called 5.0 instead of 4.22.

    It’s just that the major bump in the version number gives the impression that there might be a huge number of major new changes but that’s not the case here.

Plenty more coverage today and installation/upgrade guidance

  • Linux kernel 5.0 released and here is how to install it

    Linus Torvalds the creator and the principal developer of the Linux kernel announced the release of Linux kernel version 5.0. This release increases the major kernel version number to 5. from 4.x. The new change does not mean anything and does not affect programs in any way.

  • Linux kernel 5.0

    The first release of Linux kernel of the new 5.0 line just landed in Sparky “unstable” repository.

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, How to Install it in Ubuntu

    The mainline kernels do not include any Ubuntu-provided drivers or patches. They are not supported and are not appropriate for production use

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Is Officially Out, ReactOS 0.4.11 Released, Python 2.7.16 Now Available, Some Linux Mint Updates and Rancher Labs Launches K3s

    Linux kernel 5.0 is out. Linus writes, "We have more than a handful of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go "Hmm, things are really unstable". In fact, at least two thirds of the patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it's not like 5.0 itself looks bad." The merge window for 5.1 is now open.

  • Linux 5.0 Released

    Linus Torvalds has released Linux 5.0 in kicking off the kernel's 28th year of development. Linux 5.0 features include AMD FreeSync support, open-source NVIDIA Turing GPU support, Intel Icelake graphics, Intel VT-d scalable mode, NXP PowerPC processors are now mitigated for Spectre Variant Two, and countless other additions.

  • Linux 5.0 Introduces New Security Capabilities

    Linux 5.0, the first major milestone release of the open-source Linux kernel in 2019, launched on March 3.

    Linux 5.0 is the first version of the kernel since April 2015, when Linux 4.0 was released, with a major new version number. That said, Linux creator Linus Torvalds really doesn't assign a specific significance to new major version numbers, but rather the incremental number adjustment is somewhat arbitrary.

    "The numbering change is not indicative of anything special," Torvalds wrote in Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) message. "If you want to have an official reason, it's that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0."

LWN's Belated Coverage

  • The 5.0 kernel has been released.

    Headline features from this release include the energy-aware scheduling patch set, a bunch of year-2038 work that comes close to completing the core-kernel transition, zero-copy networking for UDP traffic, the Adiantum encryption algorithm, the seccomp trap to user space mechanism, and, of course, lots of new drivers and fixes. See the KernelNewbies 5.0 page for lots of details.

Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, This is What’s New

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released, This is What’s New

    Previously earmarked to be version 4.21, the new release comes with a bucket full of improvements (as you’d expect).

    But don’t expect grand changes just because there’s a natty new version number.

    Linus Torvalds explains that: “The numbering change is not indicative of anything special. If you want to have an official reason, it’s that I ran out of fingers and toes to count on, so 4.21 became 5.0”.

    Hey Linus: if you ever need more fingers to count on, there are plenty of people willing to lend a hand …oh my god what a terrible joke why am I still typing it.

CRN

  • Linux 5.0 debuts – which means absolutely nothing

    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has released version 5.0 of the Linux kernel.

    In his announcement of the release, Torvalds wrote “I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that ‘5.0’ doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.” And once Torvalds gets post-digital, in terms of being able to keep track of release numbers, he rolls over from version .20 to .0.

More on Linux 5.0

  • SD Times news digest: Linux 5.0; Automation Anywhere’s free community edition, and Google’s .dev TLD now available

    Linux 5.0 has been released. According to an email sent by Linus Torvalds, there were a few issues at launch, but bug fixes are being worked on. “Regardless – all is well that ends well. We have more than a handful of real fixes in the last week, but not enough to make me go “Hmm, things are really unstable”. In fact, at least two thirds of the patches are marked as being fixes for previous releases, so it’s not like 5.0 itself looks bad,” he wrote.

    According to Torvalds, the 5.0 release isn’t that much bigger than previous releases, but that the 4.x releases were getting big enough in number that it was time for 5.x releases to start. He also noted that the merge window for 5.1 is already open and he has already received several pull requests.

"it’s not as big a deal as it sounds"

  • Linux 5.0 released (it’s not as big a deal as it sounds)

    Billions of devices run software that relies on the Linux kernel, including Android smartphones and tablets, Internet of Things devices, and servers and even some desktop and laptop computers (the things you probably think of first when you think of Linux).

    Linux founder Linus Torvalds released the first version of the Linux Kernel in 1991. Since then it’s grown into a massive free and open source project that powers much of the world’s technology.

    Today Torvalds announced the release of Linux 5.0 — and to be honest, it’s nothing special… or at least no more special than any other kernel update. While there are a number of bug fixes and new features, Torvalds notes that “we don’t do feature-based releases, and that “5.0” doesn’t mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.”

Google Code

  • Linux 5.0 “Shy Crocodile” Arrives With Google’s Adiantum Encryption

    Linus Torvalds just released version 5.0 of the Linux kernel, codenamed “Shy Crocodile”. Linux 5.0 includes Google’s new encryption tech as well as support for AMD FreeSync, Raspberry Pi touch screens, and more goodies.

    Linux 5.0 arrived on March 3, 2019. As Linus explained back in January on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML,) this isn’t really a huge release:

Linux 5 is now out

  • Linux 5 is now out

    Nothing special Torvalds just ran out of fingers and toes

    Linux 5.0, the first major milestone release of the open-source Linux kernel in 2019, has been launched.

    Linux 5.0 is the first version of the kernel since April 2015, when Linux 4.0 was released, with a significant latest version number.

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds doesn’t appear to be particularly excited and does not see a specific significance in reaching the big 5.0.

    IT’s “Mr Sweary” said the numbering change was not indicative of anything special.

Linux 5.0: A major milestone with minor improvements

  • Linux 5.0: A major milestone with minor improvements

    In an earlier Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) message, Torvalds had written "About 50 percent [of Linux 5.0] is drivers, 20 percent is architecture updates, 10 percent is tooling, and the remaining 20 percent is all over (documentation, networking, filesystems, header file updates, core kernel code..). Nothing particular stands out, although I do like seeing how some ancient drivers are getting put out to pasture (*cough*isdn*cough*)."

    That said, it does contain some worthwhile improvements.

    The new Linux comes with Google's Adiantum storage encryption system. Adiantum works on low-powered devices such as Android smartphones. It's a big step forward in securing these devices. It's faster than previous encryption systems. Paul Crowley and Eric Biggers, of Google's Android Security & Privacy Team, blogged, "Storage encryption protects your data if your phone falls into someone else's hands Adiantum is an innovation in cryptography designed to make storage encryption more efficient for devices without cryptographic acceleration, to ensure that all devices can be encrypted."

Linux 5.0 is out except it's really 4.21

  • Linux 5.0 is out except it's really 4.21 because Linus 'ran out of fingers and toes' to count on

    Linus Torvalds has squeezed out version 5.0 of the Linux kernel and flung open the merge window for its follow-up, 5.1.

    In the post announcing the arrival, Torvalds was at pains to point out that feature-based releases really aren't a thing and the 5.0 "doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes".

    However, there is actually much to delight Linux lovers in the release, which had been known as "4.21" before Torvalds' fingers and toes moment.

By Swapnil Bhartiya

  • Linux 5.0 Is Here

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux kernel has announced the release of Linux 5.0. Despite any excitement around the major release number, the fact is these numbers really don’t mean much. Torvalds has often said that he chooses a new number when the version number becomes too long. He simply doesn’t want “the numbers are big enough that you can't really distinguish them.”

    Announcing 5.0, Torvalds wrote, “I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that "5.0" doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes.”

    That said there are many new features in this release, including support for GPUs. Linux 5.0 comes with improvement for AMD FreeSync, NVIDIA RTX Turing, and Raspberry Pi Touch Display support. It also comes with Google's Adiantum storage encryption system.

Linux 5.0 is not a big deal, claims Kernel Kitten

  • Linux 5.0 is not a big deal, claims Kernel Kitten

    As you may be aware, I, Colonel Kitten took a leave of absence last year, in order to learn how to be more empathetic and calm. Unfortunately, due to an admin error, I was accidentally enrolled in a macrame class. I am still fuming, but I make a really nice wicker basket.

    SO STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND LISTEN!

    Commander Torvalds has sent a memo. I have memorised the contents. Private Jones…. eat the memo.

    Linux 5.0 has been released for manoeuvres. I realise that this is normally rewarded with a day of mess leave, but the Commander has said clearly that it's not significant:

    "I'd like to point out (yet again) that we don't do feature-based releases, and that '5.0' doesn't mean anything more than that the 4.x numbers started getting big enough that I ran out of fingers and toes."

One last

  • Linux Kernel 5.0 Released | Download Now

    Latest version of the Linux Kernel is out now. Yes, You heard it right. Linux Kernl 5.0 has been released. Linux Torvalds announces the release of latest version of Linux Kernel.

Took Linux Foundation One Week to Cover Linux 5.0

  • New Linux Kernel: The Big 5.0

    Linus Torvalds at last made the jump with the recent release of kernel 5.0. Although Linus likes to say that his only reason to move on to the next integer is when he runs out of fingers and toes with which to count the fractional part of the version number, the truth is this kernel is pretty loaded with new features.

    On the network front, apart from improvements to drivers like that of the Realtek R8169, 5.0 will come with better network performance. Network performance has been down for the last year or so because of Spectre V2. The bug forced kernel developers to introduce something called a Retpoline (short for "RETurn tramPOLINE") to mitigate its effect. The changes introduced in kernel 5.0 "[...] Overall [give a greater than] 10% performance improvement for UDP GRO benchmark and smaller but measurable [improvements] for TCP syn flood" according to developer Paolo Abeni.

    What hasn't made the cut yet is the much anticipated integration of WireGuard. Wireguard is a VPN protocol that is allegedly faster, more versatile and safer than the ones currently supported by the kernel. Wireguard is easy to implement, uses state of the art encryption, and is capable of maintaining the network link to the VPN up even if the user switches to a different WiFi network or changes from WiFi to a wired connection.

Weeks late

  • NEWS

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, has announced the release of Linux 5.0. Despite any excitement around the major release number, the fact is these numbers really don't mean much. Torvalds has often said that he chooses a new number when the version number becomes too long. He simply doesn't want a situation where "the numbers are big enough that you can't really distinguish them."

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Women In Linux Podcast

  • LHS Episode #355: Warp Two

    Hello and welcome to the 355th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts wrap up Field Day 2020 and then dive into other topics including: RSGB webinars, the WIA, the QSO Today Ham Expo, open-source COVID-19 tracking software, Linux Mint 20, ADS-B trackers for Raspberry Pi and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week out there.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Amy Rich | Director of Engineering

    Amy Rich has been an Ops person for over 25 years at a variety of companies, helped ship Firefox to hundreds of millions of users, owned her own consulting business, helped organize multiple conferences for USENIX, and written professionally on the topic of UNIX systems administration.

  • #WOMENINLINUX Podcast: Amy Rich – Redox

    On this episode of the #WomenInLinux Podcast we have Amy Rich! [...] In her head, she frames what she loves about her job as “bringing order from chaos.” Amy values being able to use her technical and professional skills to make a positive difference in the world. These days her job title reads “Sr. Director of DevOps” at Redox. and a member of the Board of Directors of the USENIX Association. In her spare time she’s a board/card game addict, Star Wars LEGO nerd, horrible guitar player, fan of music, books, and movies, and enjoy taking pictures of the places traveled.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Denise Barreto | Community & Leadership

    Denise W. Barreto is an entrepreneur, author and TEDx speaker with over 20 years of leadership and marketing experience across multiple industries. As founder and managing partner of Relationships Matter Now her firm serves businesses of all sizes, non-profit and government agencies who want to better leverage their relationships to grow their bottom line through strategic planning, HR system infrastructure, organizational and leader development and inclusion and diversity strategy.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Lynn Langit – BigData/Cloud Architect

    Lynn Langit creates big data and cloud architectures with AWS, Microsoft, Google, and OpenStack technologies. She also works with SQL Server, MongoDB, Google Big Query, Redis, Neo4j, and Hadoop. Lynn is also the cofounder of Teaching Kids Programming, and has spoken on data and cloud technologies in many countries. She is an ACM Distinguished Speaker.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Julie Gunderson – Community Manager

    Former Community Manager for Taos. Julie Gunderson is a DevOps Advocate at PagerDuty, where she works to further the adoption of DevOps best practices and methodologies. She has been actively involved in the DevOps space for over five years and is passionate about helping individuals, teams and organizations understand how to leverage DevOps and develop amazing cultures. Julie has delivered talks at conferences such as DevOpsDays, Velocity, Agile Conf, OSCON and more, as well as being community moderator at opensource.com. Julie is also a founding member and co-organizer of DevOpsDays Boise.

Hardware: Arduino Nano, Advantech and Adafruit

  • Clockception combines 24 clocks to create one clock

    What if you were to use the hands of a clock not as an individual display, but as part of an array combines together to form digits? That’s the idea behind Clockception by creator “Made by Morgan,” which utilizes 48 servo motors to drive 24 clock-like faces for an 8×3 display. The build uses an Arduino Nano and three servo driver boards to control movement, along with a DS1302 RTC module to track time. The overall clock is constructed out of stained poplar, while the dial assemblies are 3D-printed.

  • Change the volume of any app on your PC with the turn of a knob

    Overall computer volume control is important, but what if you want to get more granular, adjusting sound from various applications individually? Rather than going through a series of menus and on-screen sliders, Ruben Henares’ Maxmix lets you do this on the fly. Based on an Arduino Nano, the simple yet stylish knob takes input from an encoder and button to cycle through and select a program. Just push down and then rotate to turn the volume up or down. Want to switch from Discord to Spotify? Click it again and repeat the process.

  • Atom C3000 net appliance offers options for 10GbE, PoE, WiFi 6, and 5G

    Advantech’s fanless, -20 to 70°C tolerant “FWA-1112VC” net appliance runs Linux on an Atom C3000 with 6x GbE or 4x GbE with 2x 10GbE SFP+ ports along with optional PoE and 3x M.2 for SATA, WiFi 6, and 4G/5G. Advantech has announced a highly customizable, IP40-protected desktop networking system with extended temperature support. The FWA-1112VC is described in the Electropages story where we found out about it as the latest in the company’s “entry and mid-level white boxes for SD-WAN and uCPE.”

  • QuickFeather Board is Powered by QuickLogic EOS S3 Cortex-M4F MCU with embedded FPGA (Crowdfunding)

    Yesterday, I wrote about what I felt what a pretty unique board: Evo M51 board following Adafruit Feather form factor, and equipped with an Atmel SAMD51 Cortex-M4F MCU and an Intel MAX 10 FPGA. But less than 24 hours later, I’ve come across another Adafruit Feather-sized Cortex-M4F board with FPGA fabric. But instead of using a two-chip solution, QuickLogic QuickFeather board leverages the company’s EOS S3 SoC with a low-power Cortex-M4F core and embedded FPGA fabric.

"ATGC" Aims To Offer Greater Garbage Collection Efficiency For F2FS

F2FS as the Flash-Friendly File-System for Linux continues to see a lot of interesting developments for this file-system beginning to appear on more Android devices and elsewhere given its feature set from flash optimizations to native encryption and compression capabilities. The newest F2FS feature work worth mentioning is support for age-threshold based garbage collection (ATGC). This ATGC garbage collection is geared to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the background garbage collection for the file-system by evaluating older candidates first based on a defined age threshold. Read more

GNUnet 0.13.0 released

We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.13.0. This is a new major release. It breaks protocol compatibility with the 0.12.x versions. Please be aware that Git master is thus henceforth INCOMPATIBLE with the 0.12.x GNUnet network, and interactions between old and new peers will result in signature verification failures. 0.12.x peers will NOT be able to communicate with Git master or 0.13.x peers. In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.13.0 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance. Read more Also: Glibc-HWCAPS To Help With AMD Zen Optimizations, Other Per-CPU Performance Bits